Chasing computer wiring (Cat-5) into plaster over brick wall

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Hello Owain

Nah. I still have a DACS unit in the loft from their first attempt, since then they had no spare pairs at all. (And it throttles at 28.8kbps, unable to connect at 33.6 - same at a previous house when I had it) That was replaced by HH, which provides two lines over one pair.
What I /think/ they're doing is swapping my pair with my neighbours (who are all PSTN) so they get the crap ones but don't notice, and I get the best pair for my HH. Either that or there's some very odd wiring gone on. (3km from village concentrator, last half has been recabled this year, only me and my two neighbours on the last km)
Still, I'm providing a service to them. Lots of their engineers are experiencing a lovely little valley they'd otherwise never get to see. :)
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 16:01:30 GMT, Simon Avery wrote:

Lots? There are only two maybe three that come out this far. I'm getting to know them quite well...
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Hello Dave

Yeah, apart from one old guy who really knew the system well[1] and visited us twice, we've never had the same guy again.
--
[1] His first words were "It won't work y'know, there ain't enough
cables up there." He were right, too.
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Simon Avery wrote:

The landline networks were already built, the mobile companies are still paying for their networks and licences.
The phones themselves are heavily subsidised.
Each base station has a limited capacity (far lower than that of a telephone exchange) so you need more of them to cover a certain area.
If you were starting from scratch then arguably mobile would be cheaper.
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 00:25:58 UTC, Dave Plowman

I agree. However, PERHAPS a wireless link might be better down the garden, if only to save having to bury the cable in a trench...
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Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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I can see they have their uses, but since you'll be presumably cabling up other things in the house at the same time I can't see the point.
--
*Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 22:31:25 UTC, Dave Plowman

Again, I agree. I cabled network, power, telephone, TV, burglar alarm, antenna rotator and smoke alarms all at the same time...
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Bob Eager
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 23:31:25 +0100, Dave Plowman

I have CAT5 all over the house and a lot of outlets. However, I also have a wireless installation because it is useful with portable devices like notebooks and PDAs so that they can be used in arbitrary places without needing to plug them in.
.andy
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Hello Dave

I said "imo", and it is. yo is obviously different, neither is set in stone. We're theorising what might happen in ten years' time - it's better to be a bit vague I think, rather than state what's true now and ignore any chance for it to change.
Tell you what, ask me again in ten years and I might agree with you. :)
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 17:10:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

Wireless networking is good and useful technology, no question, even with the incompetence of the security surrounding it - that's another story.
However at the lower cost end of the market, with 802.11b (11Mbit gross, 3-5Mbit net if you are lucky), the speed may well not be good enough for some applications such as video or high speed visualisation which may well become consumerised in the next few years. Even the newer 802.11g stuff which is purported to be 5x faster may not be that adequate.
Also, all of these technologies at present are shared medium - you are creating what amounts to be a hub. If all you want to do or foresee doing is sharing a "broadband" connection at today's speeds and perhaps a printer, and you want to do it at home or small office, then this will be OK. If you are doing file sharing or other server based things, then probably not. I think that the home server is likely to be an increasingly popular concept over the next few years, and with some of the suggested functionality, low speed networks may become a problem.
If you view that the sub 100 prices per node are OK and that you will upgrade by replacement, then it's a reasonable position to take, but wireless technology is changing pretty fast in comparison to wired systems.
Radio spectrum space at usable frequency ranges for the application may become the limiting factor.
.andy
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     snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) writes:

Yes, the new building regs requiring conduit to be installed in new houses for Internet access should just be coming into force as the last of the LAN cabling completely vanishes ;-) Yes, you guessed it, that's yet another stunning comedy show by the office of the deputy prime minister...
Personally, I will stick with wired LAN links for the foreseable future, but I doubt most people will.

Depends quite what you mean, but mine is. The family finds it quite amusing when they visit me that, for instance, the landing light comes on automatically if you walk out of one of the bedrooms and it's dark outside, and at Christmas time, the fairy lights on the tree go off when there's no one in the room to see them [catch fire].
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Simon Avery wrote:

http://wrbb.net / They're having problems getting the gear approved at the moment but the idea looks sound enough, it might be a while before the network spreads around the country but look at how mobile phones started. There's a bit of interest at the moment in pubs becoming WiFi mini-ISPs, there's a lot of kit out there at the moment that can be linked by it and it makes sense instead of wiring everything together:- jukebox, quiz machine, internet terminal, email facility, advertising screens etc.
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James...
http://www.jameshart.co.uk /
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 20:19:36 +0100, "James Hart"

Interesting idea and I hope that they are successful.

This is like the Starbucks idea in the U.S. The only thing was that they found that people hung around for too long without drinking enough latte.
I quite often use the Telia Homerun service on business trips in Scandinavia. They have hotspots in places like the airports, major hotels and certain parts of major cities. You can have an ongoing subscription, but you can also buy 24hr scratch cards for about 10 which have a password. It's then possible to have access in any hot spot location during that time without paying again. Compared with being gouged by hotels for phone charges for modem access, it's a good deal.
A lot of hotels in Germany are implementing similar systems and there are a few starting to appear here as well.
.andy
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Hello James

One of many I've checked out, but sadly none are anywhere near me. (10M S of Exeter)

Yeah, that's not a bad idea at all. TBH I'm not fussed how I get a better connection, as long as it's fat and has low latency. :)
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 17:10:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

Is a community wireless solution an option for your area or are you too spread out?

Do you remember the Star Trek episode where they found silicon based beings and the doctor treated an injured one by filling it with Polyfilla?
.andy
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 20:25:48 +0100, Andy Hall wrote:

It's worth looking at but to do well needs a fair bit of capital, for the net connection, local servers acces points and any backbone links required to cover outlying areas. This capital can probably be found from the relevant Area Development Agency, Rural EDZ, County Council, education and other funding bodies. Getting and making the thing sustainable is the hard bit.
Says him from the Broadband Capital of England, Alston Moor, about as remote as you can get in England. Penetration of wireless broadband to homes is about 25%, the national average (where broadband is avialable) is around 4%.

You wouldn't have to, you'd just need to talk to it nicely and it would produce a suitable means if hanging the picture for you.
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 21:59:32 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

Have you done that on point to point links?
I'm always amazed by what the Nowegians manage with wireless technology in difficult situations like this. It costs, but it can be done.
Part of the problem in the UK is that BT grossly overmarketed "broadband" in terms of high capability and low price and then realised that they couldn't deliver.
As a result, people have come to expect service at a price below what is required to pay for the infrastructure and sustain a business.
.andy
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 22:33:02 +0100, Andy Hall wrote:

Not quite sure what you mean. There is a backbone structure, ie. PtP links, connecting a number of access points. The access points would be PtMP in this context. The length of the PtP links varies from less than 500m to over 16km, some of the PtMP links are well over 2km.

Off the shelf kit though nothing "special", choose your (external) antenna to make up the loss on the link due to distance. Some are little flat patches, others are 24" dishes. Does need to be line of sight.
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 23:46:35 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

That's what I was getting at.

.andy
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Hello Andy

It's possible, I am only a mile or so away from a village, although local geography means it isn't line-of-sight. Not sure how fussy that bit is, or whether I could get away with running some coax half a mile to the top of the hill without anyone noticing. :)
I am LOS to a pretty major aerial system (Haldon, S of Exeter) though, which handles much of the microwave traffic in the area. Be nice if I could get something from there, but they probably wouldn't appreciate me climbing it at night with a pringles can and silver foil. :(

! Nope, that one must've missed me by!
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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