Chasing computer wiring (Cat-5) into plaster over brick wall

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How ?!
Chasing the wall out is the easy bit (SDS gouge !) but do I put into thin conduit (there's about 6 wired to get in) and plaster over, how do I keep in place whilst I plaster ?
Any help appeeciated.
Thanks
Paul.
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snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com (Zymurgy) wrote in message

Hi
I use galvanised clout nails (as used for shed felt) overlapped with the edges if its capping.
For conduit (which I've found less use for) I've used 40mm sheradised pins knocked in at an angle to hold it just enough to plaster over.
I'd also consider using dabs of GripFix or something similar to glue it in place if there was a longer length.
HTH IanC
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snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com (Zymurgy) wrote:
Hello Zymurgy

Up to you. The plaster won't hurt it, and it's not mains nor gas nor water, so it won't hurt anyone if you drill into it.

Dabs of plaster every few inches. Or masonry nails if you'll be leaving it for a while.
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 20:05:41 GMT, Simon Avery wrote:

True but thing of the agro trying to repair it...
Steel capping is cheap and easy to fit. Though to be honest for LV stuff like this I'd be looking at a larger duct, say 3" square in a hidden corner somewhere even if it extends cable runs considerably. 'Cause as sure as eggs is eggs something will need to be changed or added in the next 10 years.
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"Dave Liquorice" wrote

Great, thanks for the advice, however after gouging a sample out. the plaster is only 10mm thick, so there'll be very little covering it when I plaster over.
Is there any mileage in going through the first course and threading the wires down the cavity ? I don't think theres much chance in going down through the plaster, as theres no space for conduit, so i'd have to plaster over the 'bare' wires.
I may just go wireless !!
Cheers
Paul.
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Tack it in place with cable clips and simply plaster over the lot.
--
*You can't have everything, where would you put it?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On 17 Aug 2003 02:16:40 -0700, Zymurgy wrote:

Steel capping is not that thick you should have a couple of mm over the top, ample. Anyway you have an SDS cutting a shallow grove in the wall under the plaster shouldn't be a problem. What is the wall made of? Probably block, very soft and easy to cut.

Generally wires should not be in the cavity. It's quite easy for them to form a damp bridge or feed any vermin that get in. Anyway shouldn't that cavity be filled with insulation. Threading stuff through the insulation could vary from fun to impossible.

I wouldn't, cable is cheap, fast, secure and reliable. You can also feed other signals down Cat5, like telephones, audio, video etc.
--
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Dave, I'm looking into this at the moment (currently got a hard-wired set-up in one room) and am moving to another property, which currently has 2 cable connections (1 in livingroom and one in diningroom/sittingroom). I want to have my PC's upstairs but use the connection in the diningroom. Ideally I'd like to plug the cable modem into the transmitter and have only that downstairs (with the PC we use as a router on the other end of it), but could also go with having the router PC downstairs in the dining room plugged into the cable modem and then into the wi-fi.
What wireless network are you using, can you advise on how much it might cost for connections for 3 PC's? Should this be useable upstairs?
Cheers!
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set-up
cable
I'd
If you have a cable modem (with an Ethernet interface) then you need a cable router/WiFi AP.
I have just bought
http://www.dabs.com/products/prod-info3-info.asp?&m=y&quicklinx=2N95
for 52.87 and it works fine for me (not on cable, but as an alternative to an AP on my ADSL LAN - long story).
I also bought a pair of USB adapters
http://www.dabs.com/products/prod-info3-info.asp?&m=y&quicklinx 8Z
although I paid 50 for a pair :-( Price has just gone down again.
I favour USB adapters because you can position them to get the best signal.
So roughly 50 for the AP/router, (3* 25) = 75 for 3 adapters gives you 125 for a 3 PC setup.
Should be O.K. with the AP downstairs and the PCs upstairs but YMMV - each house is different.
Note that this is a budget router so it doesn't have a serial port for low level configuration and AFAIK doesn't have a CLI via Telnet either. This means that if you can't do what you want via the web interface you are snookered.
Having said that, if your needs are straightforward this seems a great little router. For the price you get: all the router basics including NAT, DHCP, DNS. wireless LAN with 128 bit WEP and MAC address filtering wired LAN with 4 port 100Mb hub.
Other places to go: alt.internet.wireless NG which is always helpful.
HTH Dave R
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Hello Dave

But chance of it happening is pretty small, especially if you're still living there and wired properly. (No bends, verticals to visible point etc)

F'sure, but I expect it to still be using copper (fibre being a maybe for commercial properties) so just swapping the connectors and leaving the wiring in situ should be ok for most upgrades.
Hell, I'm still using Coax for my LAN here. It works!
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 13:41:49 GMT, Simon Avery wrote:

Assuming that the format of the copper is correct. Mind you you can't go far wrong with the good old twisted pair, almost anything can be made to travel over that, audio, video, data, POTS, ISDN etc etc

At 10Mbps? 100Mbps is "standard" now, it does make a noticeable difference. I expect Gigabit stuff will be "standard" inside 5 years. How far Gigabit, that expects Cat6 cable, will go on a bit of old Cat5 (not Cat5e) might be interesting but I'd expect it to work over "domestic" lengths of at most afew tens of metres.
--
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Hello Dave

Indeed, and with wireless everything now so cheap, it's getting harder to justify wiring, imo. Just need a rx/tx widget in each room and everything in it talks to that.
Are computerised houses coming more popular? Don't hear much of them.

Ack, but 10 "works" fast enough for my purposes. :)
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 08:57:50 GMT, Simon Avery wrote:

I don't know of a single wireless tx/rx widget that will do video, audio, LAN, POTS and ISDN. Several wireless widgets yes but some share the same frequency band (2.4Ghz) and that is getting really rather crowded and speed/reliabilty are real issues.

Define computerised? Nearly all larger domestic white goods have a microcontroller inside now, dsihwashers, washing machines, uWaves, heating controllers etc. They don't talk to each other yet though, with the advent of things like Bluetooth I wonder how long it will be before they do but is there and real need?

300bps modems where fast enough at one time, thats how I started this computer comms lark back in the late '80s. I now have a 100Mbps net connection... (Well thats the speed into the WAN NIC, there is an RF bottle neck which reduces the throughput to around 1Mbps in practice).
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No it's not - a wired link will always be better.
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*How come you never hear about gruntled employees? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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London SW 12

Always be better? Even if your requirements are to connect from across a busy street? Or to connect from the bottom of the garden? Wireless is perfectly acceptable for most domestic users this year - there will be a minority with more complex needs but "always better"?
Sir, methinks you are a Troll!
Dave R
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wrote:

I am not inventing reasons :-)
(1) I have my (IT illiterate) next door neighbour on my WLAN so I can maintain his system for him and download Windows and virus updates without spending hours tying up his phone line. (2) I am considering adding the folks across the road for similar reasons. (3) I like to be able to take the portable into the garden now and then to work. (4) At the moment I have no power (or anything else, really) in the new office/bedroom and I am temporarily running my LAN from the loft, where I have my ADSL line, ADSL modem/router. and WiFi AP all sitting up there powered by an extension lead. I have three PCs running in house of the WLAN and switching from wired to wireless took minutes. (5) I have no desire to wire the whole house (with consequent mess and disruption) to provide access for occasional PCs (such as returning offspring). For Internet surfing and email, wireless fits the bill admirably.
So there are 5 seperate instances where wirelss is superior to wired because I don't need high bandwidth and I don't have to run wires.
For any heavy/complex/high bandwidth activities wired is the way to go. However it is extremely blinkered, even illogical, to state that something is "always better"; this implies that there is no situation whatsoever where a wireless link is better than a wired link. So patently illogical that it had all the hallmarks of a Troll :-)
Cheers Dave R
P.S. (6) I also like to surf with my PDA when in bed or in other locations without a wired link :-) Perhaps I should start an "I love WiFi" thread ?
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That doesn't make it superior - only more convenient. And I'd point out that my response was in connection with the average house - not the whole street.

I stand by what I said. Wireless links may be more convenient, but they are never better.
--
*Could it be that "I do " is the longest sentence? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 09:29:33 +0100, Dave Plowman

I think you need to give some reasons, not just assertions, g is cheap enough, and provides plenty of bandwidth (yes its shared between machines, but for domestic use it's very rarely saturated, and most people use hubs not switches so that's the same.)
Jim.
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Hello Dave

This is devolving into semantics, but "better" is not a particularly specific word. What's better for you clearly isn't better for David.
"Convenient" can be included in a definition of "better", imo.
--
Simon, who doesn't have any wifi stuff at all.


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Hello Dave

I was reminded of this thread today when my phone line went down. BT, after playing the "no answer, hold, hold, get disconnected, get lied to, get disconnected and then hold again for three hours" game with the teletubbies tell me it'll be at least four days before an engineer is sent to deal. This has happened six times over the past three years.
Never had a single outage on my mobile in that time (apart from no signal in some valleys, which considering where I live is to be expected).
Stretching the point perhaps, but at least the air never seems to break.
This probably won't reach you until the 26th though...
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