British/French plumbing

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houses,
run
cold
Strange - I thought it was normal to have all the cold taps fed from the mains, that's how my houses have been. I'd always wondered why there was this thing about not drinking from an upstairs tap.
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Even stranger. In most houses are cold water is mains fed to all taps except the bath so that a shower or mixer can be used - certainly the washbasin should be and usually is mains fed.
If your house has mains cold water to all taps, bath included, then you must have a mains fed instant water heater so that both hot and cold pressures are the same. If you did not there would be a risk of cold mains water running back through a mixer tap into the hot tank, which I doubt is acceptable by water regulations.
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except
must
No the bath is definately fed from the mains - out of interest I just checked - ran the tap on full for a while, but no sound of the tank filling. The taps are separate, not mixer. One shower is electric (mains fed), the other is power (fed from hot water and header tanks). The hot water is conventional - header tank, cylinder, gas boiler etc.
Peter.
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harrogate wrote:

Not sure that you "must" although it will obviously fix the pressure difference.....
Our house has mains fed cold to all taps including the bath. The only cold feeds from the cistern go to the hot water cylinder and the shower. The bath has a mixer tap with gravity fed hot water and mains cold.

They are normally far more worried about (potentially un-clean) water being fed back into the mains...
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Even if you have all your water from the mains, a phosphor descaler may be on all the house except the kitchen and outside taps. You are advised not to drink descaled water.
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My parent's house used to be gravity cold on all taps, except the kitchen sink. Now every tap, hot and cold, is mains pressure through a Megaflo. You still shouldn't drink from an upstairs tap, as the cold is softened up there.
My previous house had mains cold and gravity hot (pump assisted by the time I'd left). My current house has mains cold and gravity hot. Next week it should have mains hot and cold.
The installed base is currently getting much more mains based, IME. In particular, a lot of combi boilers seem to get installed these days.
Christian.
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You
time
Like 650-700,000 per year out of near one million fitted. Combi's will soon become the "traditional" boiler.
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houses,
run
cold
It is probably historical. When water was supplied to Londoners from the waterwheels under London Bridge, it only flowed for a few hours each day, so you had to have a storage tank if you wanted water at other times. A lot of French houses still have a supply pumped from a well, although, if they have mains water, that is only supposed to be used for watering the garden..
Colin Bignell
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so
of
have
I believe the tanks in the loft came about when Manchester was being piped and taking water from the Lake district.
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houses,
run
cold
Talking of British and French plumbing - lets get to the loos. In France flushing seems to be always done by pressing a button on the top of the tank or a small leaver on the side. Whilst in Britain we have the leaver and syphon, which often seems to go faulty after a time. Why the difference? Can the French flushing mechanisms be used here?
Peter.
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In article
wrote:

Mine's not missed a beat in 22 years. The technical name for the syphon flush is/was WWP - waste water preventer. If it is faulty nothing happens, unlike the arrangements which have a valve in the bottom of the flushing tank. I suspect it all goes back to the days when water supplies were much less reliable (thus the c.w. cistern in the loft) and is also down to our water being unmetered, so water undertakings needed to know that the chances of it just running to waste were minimised
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Snowman

A flap valve seal can leak and water will run down the toilet. This does not happen with a syphon flush. Flap vales require less water to flush, although bowls are designed to take a certain amount of water, so too little and no flush. raising the cistern does help, like having it in the loft.
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Aren't French style mechanisms banned in Britain? I seem to remember that the EU wanted Britain to change its rules a few years ago to permit the foreign systems. The argument against was that the British water supply wouldn't be able to cope with millions of leaking cisterns.
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"Snowman" wrote | Talking of British and French plumbing - lets get to the loos. In France | flushing seems to be always done by pressing a button on the top of the tank | or a small leaver on the side. Whilst in Britain we have the leaver and | syphon, which often seems to go faulty after a time.
I still think a proper chain is best; stand back and pull any-old-how and the water descends.
Owain
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Another discussion point might be why the French apparently adopted the British imperial plumbing sizes, hence you have 1/2", 3/4", 1", etc. pipes and fittings rather than nicely rounded metric sizes: 10mm, 20mm, 30mm, etc. Its always worth pointing this out if a French person moans about the British using imperial weights and measures (And by the way, French trains run on the left, just like in Britain.) Can any one confirm if plumbing fittings bought in France are exactly interchangeable with equivalents bought in Britain?
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    j_p snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (JS) writes:

Their standard copper tube sizes are not the same, e.g. IIRC, 14mm is one of their standard ones.
One interesting feature of their gas plumbing is that appliance isolation valves have to include a feature to automatically cut off the supply in the event of excessive gas flow, like if the appliance falls off the wall and gas pipe breaks off. Kind of like a gas MCB ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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IIRC, the only copper pipe size that is, is 10mm
Threads all appear to be our 1/2", 3/4" etc and are exactly compatible.
One of the waste-pipe sizes is.
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roger
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Assuming you have the space in the roof void, and enough height to give a decent head, it has many advantages.
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*I started out with nothing... and I still have most of it.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Snowman wrote:

Not those porcelain shower-tray types where you stand on two raised "footprints" and aim for the hole? Ye Gods, they're primitive over there...

The British syphon arrangement is the more perfect solution. There's a thing called a "Duoflush" too, by which mechanism a small quantity of water or the while lot can be used, thus encouraging water saving.

Unfortunately, yes. I wonder where they were invented, I bet not in Frarnce. The trouble with the flap valve types is that they are prone to leakage. This is not environmentally or wallet friendly!
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Although someone did suggest to me that they were more hygenic, because you don't have to sit on or touch anything. And that must have been the way you "did it" before pedestal loos were invented I guess.
Peter.
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