"worn out" toilet

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I have been told my toilet is"worn out" and that is why the water flushes so slowly......that the porcelian is worn out.................have not heard of that before......suggestion by a plumber was to pour dishwashing soap in bowl every couple of days.....would improve but not much ANy ideas??? Toilet might be 20 years old
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remove the toilet and snake a towel up from the wax to the bowl thru the built-in trap, this will remove the plastic item stuck there. for solutions to your symptoms see: http://www.fluidmaster.com /
pete wrote:

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pete wrote:

I don't think I have ever heard that one before. I would not bother with detergent, it might cause more problems than it fixed.
My first thought is the dreaded blue pill. If you have been using one of those, in the tank, cleaners, I would guess that is your problem. Slow flushes are the usual result of long term usage of them.
The only wear I can think of is if the trapway was originally glazed (like the bowl, nice and shinny) and has worn so it is more like sandpaper. However most toilets come that way because they fail to glaze them and almost no one knows that it makes a difference or even that it is done.
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Say what? It takes about an hour to remove every moving part from a toilet and replace it. It takes a little longer to remove it from the floor and replace the wax gasket. If you do all that, it should work "good as new." You have exactly the same porcelain that the toilet came with.
Your problem is something other than your toilet. Something obstructing the line, the trap, or the line between the trap and further.
Steve
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wrote:

Or constricting the flow between the cistern and the bowl. Does it flush slowly with a bucket? or only when you pull the handle?
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Seriously, that diagnosis/treatment sounds nonsense.
The water is either slow to:
1. Enter the bowl. Or 2. Exit the bowl.
In case 1, you examine the flapper, water level etc.
In case 2, you start looking for a blockage or partial blockage in the toilet and/or the drains to which it is connected.
Even if the porcelain has lost its glaze and looks terrible, it's not going to have any significant impact on the water flow. However, it might make blockages rather more likely and/or frequent. I suppose a little dishwashing liquid may help avoid that problem. The Clorox toilet cleaner with Telfon would probably do the same thing better.
But you didn't characterize the problem as being one of frequent blockages -- just of poor flow.
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wrote:

The hydrolics of toilet flushing can be more complicated than they might appear. Poor flushing can be caused by partial blockage of the small holes under the rim (e.g. by the build-up of hard water deposits). This can slow the inrush of water enough to cause poor flushing. This may make a toilet appear to be "worn out". Make sure that these holes are clear and then see if your flushing improves. Another cause of poor flush action is build-up in the throat of the toilet. Make sure that this area is as clear and smooth as possible.
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The Streets wrote:

Nah, the holes under the rim are for rinsing the sides. The amount of water they furnish the bowl is miniscule.
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Nah, the holes under the rim are for rinsing the sides. The amount of water

Sorry your wrong! Not long ago I fixed a friends toilet by giving it some acid down the dip tube and in the bowl.
The crud that flowed out was amazing.
The rim holes add enough water to get the good flush going....
when you flush and see just a swirl sediment has likely plugged in interior water passages.....
Easily fixed with acid in well under a half hour
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replying to snipped-for-privacy@aol.com, JH wrote:

Can you tell me what type of acid to use and how much? Also how should I use it?
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On Thursday, December 11, 2014 10:44:08 PM UTC-6, JH wrote:

Since you are replying to an 8 year old thread, let's hope ol' Bob comes back and tells you what type of acid you should use.
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On Friday, December 12, 2014 4:49:29 AM UTC-5, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

Hydrochloric/Muriatic, available at HD, hardware stores, etc.
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On 12/12/2014 4:49 AM, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

let's hope ol' Bob comes back and tells you what type of acid you should use.

Glacial acetic, maybe?
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HeyBub wrote: ..

That was likely true in the old 5 gallon flush days, but today every oz of water counts.
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My first thought as well, if the flapper is working correctly and the sewer drain is clear. My house had three 30 year old toilets slow on the flush. With our hard city water, mineral buildup had caused a slower inrush of water thru the bowl rim. Cleaning these out with a piece of coat hanger wire (about 8 inches long) with a slight curve loosened a bunch of crud.

Right again. Clean these with the coat hanger until no more deposits and till smooth to the touch.
In my case, this cleaning let me keep my old three gallon flushers.
lee
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If you get a new toilet take preventative measures to make sure it doesn't wear out also. Stay away from whole grain and bran cereal.
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I have a bridge for sale in Brooklyn
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pete wrote:

What's to wear out? (Other than items that would not cause that symptom.)
As the other poster suggested, there's probably an obstruction of some sort somewhere in the system.
Our 25 year old toilets flush just fine.
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Try flushing solids:)with a bucket of water........
Does it flush OK??
If so theres a quick easy cheap solution!!!
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I have heard that calcium builds up in the toilet throat (part you can't see) over time and reduces the size of the opening. I have cleaned many toilets in my rentals by putting a lot of swimming pool acid into them to dissolve the stains. It would also dissolve any calcium build up in the throat. I don't measure but I would guess I put about 2 cups of acid into the bowl at a time and let it work and then flush. This creates a lot of fumes after a while so you need to have ventilation. Swimming pool acid does a great job of cleaning calcium build up off of shower doors and tiles too. You don't want to spill any on yourself. It is hard on the grout so you don't want to do it very often or use it straight.
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