working with Corian counter tops ?

What's the best way to cut a Corian counter top ? I know you just about have to use a Corian trained installer...but for simply cutting a counter...what's the best way to cut...saw...router...metal blade jig saw...etc ?
Thanks, Tim R
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TimR wrote:

That's because they won't sell it to anyone else.
--

dadiOH
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Any carbide woodworking tolls will work in Corian. It would probably be best to create a template and use a carbide router bit. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I've fabricated several countertops, some fairly elaborate. After carefully measuring several times :-) use any suitable saw to rough cut close to your layout line, then finish with a router guided by a clamped straightedege or other template. It cuts like butter.
-- Dennis
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I have had excellent luck with a 7.25" carbide blade in my 10" table saw. The narrower kerf and slower tip speed eliminates chipping. You can clean up the edges and round them over with a router. I also had good luck with fine paper in a sander. Getting Corian is hard but working ity is easy when you figure out it is hard and a bit brittle.
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