Wood Powered Car ?

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Michael Daly wrote:

Hi, Knit picking. O2 does not burn. H2 does.
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wrote:

Actually it is a distinction without a difference. If you fill a vessel with combustible gas and feed the oxygen in through a burner it looks like the oxygen is burnng.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you fill a vessel with only H2 and O2 and ignite it, the product is water and heat. If you fill a vessel with H2 and air and ignite it, the H2 and O2 will combine to form water and heat. The heat of combustion will then cause the N2 in the air to combine with the O2 to form oxides of nitrogen. That is a significant difference.
Mike
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wrote:

I agree nitrogen burns (oxidizes) when it gets hot enough.
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Michael Daly wrote:

AHA!! Mind fart on my part. I wasn't seeing where the N was coming from. Of course it is obvious as N is a large part of atmospheric air.
Harry K
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I doubt you'll find any plans. The most practical way to power a car by burning wood I can think of would we an electric car charged by a stationary steam powered generator. You could be driving on one set of batteries while another is being charged. For direct burning of wood you might be able to use a steam or Stirling cycle engine, but you'd have the problem how to stoke the engine while driving, problems with starting and stopping it for typical practical trips, and problems controlling emissions. Small steam engines don't seem to be commercially available (I've looked for solar projects) and making your own that's reliable would be a major engineering and machining effort.
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Might be cheaper/easier to convert your house over to wood and use the savings to buy gasoline (or better yet, diesel or get a hybrid)
snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

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woods a lot of work, cut the tree down, cut theb tree up, haul the logs to wherever your going to use them, split the logs stack the logs, allow the logs to dry, haul the logs, burn the logs, now dispose of the ashes.
get a job at a mini mart its probably more cost effective and a lot less work.
Years ago I knew a fellow who heated his home with wood and was proud of it.
I asked about how many hours it took his family for all the work vs the money saved.
he would of done far better at minimum wage:(
The look on his face was priceless...........
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You left out the opportunity cost of the exercise vs. no exercise vs. paying for membership in a club vs. buying home equipment. Value of ash as source of K for garden and as a way to keep the pH up. Value of being able to cook and stay warm during 4 days without any electricity due to ice storm. Actual cost of alternative heat source -- electric resistance, heat pump, oil fueled, natural gas fueled, geothermal, making more babies, huddling with dogs in a heap on the bed...
-- A cynic knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. See Also: MBA.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) says...

Back in the days when fuel oil was $0.17 a gallon, I can see that working out. Nowadays, I doubt that very much, unless he was in absolutely lousy physical condition. Wood is my primary heat source, and I don't spend much time putting up wood. Three or four days a year is all, call it a couple weekends, and my labor is tax free. The payback is worth several hundred dollars, plus tax. That's pretty good pay.
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says...

I consider a chainsaw a must out in the boonies, so I won't include that cost. It's both needed in an emergency and to keep the downed trees cleared out.
First is the wood availability. I might get a 1/4 of my needed wood off my own property. The rest needs to be scrounged up. Locals seem to do well cleaning up slash piles from the local timber companies as long as they stay on their good side. That is usually free as long as you make things better when you leave then when you got there. Done right, I won't pay for that either.
Where the cost is a problem is in the stove and installation. A DEQ qualifying stove is $1800 to $2200 for my size house. Figure another $400 to $500 for a stainless triple wall stovepipe. Install I could do myself. At least a few hundred more for a hearth and sundry other items. Since the house already has a heat pump and I would keep it as backup, this means all the money is against the cost of wood. My insurance is OK with a wood stove, but it would add $200 a year - if it was inspected by them and done right. I figure I'm going to add one of the outdoor stoves if I'm going to do it. This won't add anything to my insurance if it's more than 10 feet from the house. Plus I can feed it big wood cutting the labor.
Since my total heat bill for the winter is $400 to $600, that's a while to pay back.
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Larry Caldwell wrote:

I piddle around with it about 1 trip every week during the summer/fall. If I counted only the cost of labor, it would be a losing proposition. But there are the health benefits, the enjoyment of being out there in nature, the money saved by not doing something else for recreation, etc. The cost of a club membership to get the same excercise would be considerable by itself.
Yep, I could make more money clerking a gas station for example but would be totally bored doing it and would hate every minute.
Harry K
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proud

Good grief! Don't most people on farms still do that?
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In article

Not too many as far as I can tell. I don't see a lot of woodpiles in the yards. I think wood burning stoves make insurance companies nervous. Propane and natural gas are probably the most common in my area. One of the local farm stores started selling corn burning stoves last year. I've thought about it. I don't know if it would be allowed in my neighborhood due to the storage.
Dean
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

Nervous? Nervous!!! Gives 'em palpitations at the mere thought that they might have to pay out a claim. Just ask the people in the areas of Queens and Long Island who are getting their homeowners insurance canceled on the chance that sometime in the next 10 years or so a Cat 3+ hurricane might wander up the NJ coast and flood those areas. Bloody insurance companies make stockbrokers look like choirboys.

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On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 05:35:34 -0500, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Coal was more commonly used here (than wood) until the natural gas pipeline went through 50+ years ago. Chain saws made it easier to cut wood, but it's still labor intensive. A few people have the outdoor wood furnaces. And, enough people bought wood pellet stoves last year that there was a shortage of pellets and the price doubled. It might be a different story if wood was the primary heat source, but my insurance company is ok with wood stoves.

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Ann wrote:

My company was fine with it but only after doing a very thorough examination of the installation. I have seen a few that the insurance isn't going to pay off on if they ever have a fire as they don't come even close to a safe installation.
Harry K
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woodpiles
my
Our insurance company wouldn't have a clue how we heat our house and nor do they seem to care.
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Farm1 wrote:

They will when your house burns down due to a wood burning stove problem. At that time they will promptly point out the disclaimer text of your policy that states that they are not liable for damages caused by fire started from wood burning stoves. Read the fine print of your policy, if you heat by stove, and make sure you have the proper endorsement on your policy to cover fires cause by wood burning stoves.
Your premium will go up, but at least you will be covered. -- ML
My disclaimer: The advice in the above text is my own and not of my employer nor past employers, nor any potential future employers.
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and
text
caused
your
stoves.
Don't be so sure. What applies with insurance companies in your country doesn't apply in mine.
Wood burning heaters are acceptable to insurance companies here because our country has stingent Standards which must be met at both the production and installation stage for all wood burning stoves. They can't be installed by home owners without inspection and approval by local authorities.
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