Wood Fence Repair

I am going to replace my wood fence and need to remove the old post. Any advice on how to removing the old post from the ground, would be very helpful. Any hints on hod to get the post streight and plum?
Ron
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Advisers would need to know first what the old post is made of (wood, metal, concrete), how deep it runs, whether its base is set in concrete etc.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Hi, OP said wood fence.
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-- OP said wood fence.
OP said wood *fence*, not wood *post* so Don's question is still valid.
In addition, the questions about the depth and the use concrete are also valid.
If the post was set in concrete then the base is most likely wider than the exposed portion of the post and a simple tug with a bumper jack or fulcrum might not budge it until the concrete is fully exposed. If the installer went even further and placed re-bar horizontally through the concrete, then even more digging might be required before the post can be lifted out.
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Presuming wood; if old posts could be cut off level with ground? Or very close to it (how deep is the grass or other ground cover around posts). Note. Might save removing all, or at least some of them! Perhaps by changing the post spacing slightly only the corner post would have to come out? Then abandon old post stubs which will eventually rot away? Place new posts (of treated wood or metal?) in new locations. Build new fence. Idea? Note; Even if old posts were/are metal a horizontally cutting electric (chop?) saw could hack them off. You can use those saws to cut up a whole car; so a few wood or metal posts at ground level should be do- able?
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Instructional video at:
http://www.break.com/index/how-not-to-remove-basketball-hoop.html
PB
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On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 07:40:36 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

The post is wood 4X4X8' and is not set in concrete. I think the post is set 3' in the ground.
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Ron Lyle wrote:

Bumper jack and chain will remove the posts.
Level and temporary supports will get the posts straight.
If you have not yet purchased material, consider metal posts.
Also, if using treated pickets, let them dry thoroughly first. If they dry on the fence, you end up with 1/4" to 1/2" gaps.
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HeyBub wrote:

RL:
If you don't have a bumper jack and chain, try a long timber and chain. Use the chain and hooks to lash the timber crosswise to the post, with one end sticking way out. Put the short end on a rock as a fulcrum. The chain grabs enough to lift the post, but can easily be moved for better grip as the post comes out.
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Just did this myself.
A couple of the posts were loose in the ground. They pulled right out. A few others were already broken off at ground level. I was able to dig most of the rest out with a shovel. Just dug down on one side as deep as I could go then wiggle the post loose.
They make a level that straps to the post, allowing you to use both hands to hold the post, and verify plumb in both directions. Otherwise a helper to check level and gradually backfill the hole as you hold the post is the best method.
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If its encased in concrete, I have done it with an 80 lb. jack hammer, digging bar, chain to wrap around post and a 4 ton hydraulic kit to lift it straight it out. I had some posts that were installed with two sags of 80 lb. concrete mix (160 lb. of base in the ground per post) and were a bitch to get it out in one piece with just a digging bar.
My soil condition must be different than some of you guys as I have broke my 2 ton hoist trying to get it out. Half a day of cutting and welding got my hoist back to working condition.
The pros in my area don't dig it out, they cut it off at the base and bury it so as not to show.
Anyway as to getting the post plum I use a fence post lever like this: (Amazon.com product link shortened)91031513&sr=1-2
and you can line up the fence posts with a string above it.
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The post is a 4X4X8' and is in the ground by 3'. I would like to remove the post to use the hole. The post is not set in concrete but the new post will be set in concrete. The soil here is clay and very hard for digging with a clam shell. I sure would like to use the holes with new posts.
Ron
On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 19:13:46 -0700, "** Frank **"

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on 9/28/2007 7:09 AM Ron Lyle said the following:

How deep, if you know, are they buried? Have you tried rocking it? Does it move any? Dig a bowl shaped hole a few inches deep around the post. Fill it with water from a hose or pail. When the water soaks away, rock the post while pulling up.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

The hole is about 3' deep. I wil try your method of removel. Thanks for everyone's help.
Ron
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