Wood fence post problem

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I have a wooden fence post that is loose (for lack of a better term). It is the one that has the gate on it and when I open the gate, the post leans back from the weight at an angle. Where the cement around the post interfaces with the ground, it is okay. It doesn't move up/down or side/side. However, when the cement and the wood post interfaces, you can see a small void all the way around and that is where the sag is. It looks like the wood shrunk over the years. I have tried shim it to no luck. I would GREATLY prefer that I don't have to chip off the cement and do that again if possible. I am afraid that the post may break off at the base from the weight of the gate and the angle. Any suggestions?
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On 03/28/2016 07:03 PM, Kurt V. Ullman wrote:

If the post has no signs of rotting...I don't see why shimming did not work. Either your shims were too short and narrow, or the post has indeed rotted, but just too far beneath the surface to see.
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On 3/28/16 8:18 PM, philo wrote:

like you use for shimming windows and the longer plastic ones. The last ones seemed to go toward the center of the post as they got further in. Now, to figure a way to check that out easily.
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Kurt V. Ullman wrote:

That is an indication that the post is rotted below ground level . Bite the bullet and replace it with a bigger timber and be sure the concrete you set it in comes above ground level and is sloped to shed rain water . IMO gate posts should always be 6x6 minumum . Another thing I do if I build a gate , I make the frame of welded steel . Guaranteed not to sag , ever . I've even retrofitted steel framework to existing saggy wooden gates ...
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On 03/29/2016 8:17 AM, Kurt V. Ullman wrote:

How long has it been there and any idea of what kind of post/treatment it had? If it was one of the recent pine posts w/o the real creosote treatment, it could be almost completely rotted out in as few as 5 yr or so from what I've observed.
I'd guess the only alternative is to just bite the bullet and replace it; you'll waste more time and effort futzing around that it'll be to just do what needs done.
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 10:07:16 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

That's a good point. IDK that treated wood normally would just shrink like that without something more being wrong, ie that it may be rotted out down where you can't see. But I guess one could try pouring some epoxy or similar in there, especially if you happen to already have some.
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On 3/28/16 8:03 PM, Kurt V. Ullman wrote:

There are several repair kits available for this type of problem
The EZ Mender shown here might work for you
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/c6/c6e95c32-a548-449e-9e07-f61770b5ab81.pdf
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Nothing there for a moving gate post. Gates put a lot more stress on the post than fencing.
--
Dan Espen

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In typed:

Interesting idea. I never saw those before. Looks like it would work even if the post is rotted below the surface because it bolts/screws to the fence post above the surface..
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On Mon, 28 Mar 2016 20:03:15 -0400, "Kurt V. Ullman"

It has a low enough viscosity that it should go into the gap and it has pretty good compressive strength.
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On Monday, March 28, 2016 at 9:23:34 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or epoxy. Epoxy is thin enough that it will run in and fill a gap like that.
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trader_4 wrote:

Epoxy can be of various consistencies. "Thin" epoxy would run in quite a way, "thick" epoxy not much.
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 10:56:47 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

Choose the one like Goldielocks did. But following DPB's post, I tend to think that more is probably wrong than just the alleged shrinkage, ie that good chance it rotted down below, in which case the epoxy won't help.
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On Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:30:24 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

This just demonstrates the fallacy of "treated" lumber. Virtually all of it is just washed in the chemical and the treatment is superficial at best. If you can't buy something that is over "2" (not 0.2) CCA, you are going to be replacing it if it is in the ground. The only place to find that will be a marine contractor supply or a place that supplies utility poles. Typically that will be 2.5 CCA. The home depot stuff may be safe to eat but it is not going to last long in the ground in spite of what the label says. I would replace that post with a 6" 2.5 CCA post. If he is near Ft Myers, I have a 7' piling he can have for hauling it away.
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 12:30:31 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

I don't know if it's a matter of "choose" or of "mix".
When I used to use epoxy on a fairly regular basis, I'd buy the cans of liquid and then various containers of fillers. I'd add the proper filler based on the specific use.
http://www.westsystem.com/ss/filler-selection-guide/
Just be careful about what you mix your epoxy in:
http://www.michneboat.com/images/Mvc-635s.jpg
..snip...
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On Tue, 29 Mar 2016 10:43:11 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

In deference to Toby Keith, it is hard to beat a red solo cup for mixing epoxy. They also come in "bathroom" size to mix small batches. I get popcicle sticks at the dollar store for mixers. You can get little ones or the regular popcicle size. For bigger jobs, use tongue depressors.
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 3:45:07 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We used to cut 64 oz juice and laundry detergent bottles right below the handle for mixing large batches, especially when using filler. The wide opening made folding in the filler very easy.
http://c.shld.net/rpx/i/s/i/spin/image/spin_prod_193967901
The small resin rollers fit in them as well, not that we had a lot of time to sit around resting our rollers. ;-)
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On 03/29/2016 8:35 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Anything like that seems to me a pure waste of time and particularly w/ an epoxy $$. If the post is already rotted to such a degree (and seems pretty clear to me must be if was set in concrete), it'll just go ahead and finish rotting inside the new shell like it has already.
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dpb wrote:

+5
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wrote:

Gate wheel or caster? Some are spring loaded. Would tying a cable back from the top of the post to the fence do any good? Maybe add a turnbuckle to adjust the tension.
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