wiring a detached garage - bringing it into the house/service panel

I am in the process of planning the wiring of a detached garage. I plan on running 240v to the garage to a subpanel in 2" gray pvc...schedule 40. My question is, what is the best way of bringing it into the basement for connection to the main panel? The garage is 30ft away from the nearest side of the house, and the service panel is on the opposite side of the basement. I am running this 18" underground and no sidewalks, driveway etc. Here are the options I am thinking of:
1. Run it straight to the basement, punch a 2" hole in the concrete basement wall and run it across the basement to the service panel (still in schedule 40). 2. Run it straight to the basement, then up the side of the basement wall and bring it in through the sill plate, then across the basement to the service panel (still in schedule 40). 3. Run it outside all the way 18" underground to the other side of the basement and bring it in through where the service comes in to the house. Only thing in my way is maybe a LP gas line that I have to go over or under (not sure how deep it is buried).
I can't seem to find anything solid on how to bring it into the house. Thanks.
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All the above sound fine. You can enter the basement below ground or install a 90 degree sweep and come above ground and enter through an LB fitting. If you come above ground you may have to use an expansion fitting. Either run the pvc directly into the panel or install a junction box and splice onto a piece of romex which you can run into the panel.

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snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

go for minimum buried wire.
#1 and #2 are OK, but both expose you to a chance of water ingress through the hole in the basement wall.
I'd go at it somewhat differently -- bring the wire up out of the trench outside the house (still in conduit, of course), then into the basement a bit above the sill plate. Paint the conduit to match the house, and you'll never know it's there.
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#3 Dan

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snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Will the conduit across the basement be running with the joists or across the joist? In either case run the conduit up the outside wall and in above ground level. If you can keep the conduit up in a joist channel you should do so. If possible avoid cutting through the sill plate. The portion of the conduit that you run indoors should be metallic so that it will not contribute deadly fumes to the interior of the home during a fire or electrical fault.
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Tom Horne

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Maybe you should consider schedule 80 UPVC. Check local code.
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Lil\' Dave
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#3 - its in conduit, perfectly safe....
Borg hater wrote:

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