Wirenut Connections: Stranded to Romex

I' ve always been frustrated when it's time to connect stranded wires from a device (such as a light or fan) to the Romex non-stranded wires. Usually it's not too bad when the stranded wire is connecting to only one solid wire--I strip the stranded wire 1/8 inch longer than the solid wire. But it never seems like a very secure connection: essentially the wirenut pinches the stranded to non-stranded. Sometimes I've had to try multiple times because the wires come apart when I do the "pull test."
It gets even more frustrating when trying to attach a stranded wire to two or more solid wires. Usually I end up making a pigtail, connecting one end to the multiple solid wires and the other end to the stranded wire.
Is there a better way? What about soldering the stranded wire, then it will contact the wirenut better?
Mr Fixit eh
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Use pliers to twist the wires together tightly. Don't rely on hand tightening. You can try putting the stranded wires on first and then twist the solid wires on top of them using pliers.
There is nothing wrong with soldering, but it is more work and still must have a wire connector on it.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

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On Wed, 18 Aug 2004 12:11:25 -0700, Steve Nekias wrote

Yes, "tinning" the end of the stranded conductor makes for an easier connection with a wirenut (or around a terminal post) and helps preserve the stripped end if you have to disconnect and reconnect - keeps the strands from breaking off.
Alternatively, when connecting multiple stranded conductors, it often helps to "fan" them out and twist them all together before applying the wirenut.
When connecting small stranded fixture wires to a solid branch circuit conductor, it helps to use a fixture size wirenut (orange, blue or gray) rather than yellow. The yellows are rated for 1 #14 and 1 #18, but it's easy to tear the strands off the smaller wire with them.
There have been lot's of debates in this NG about pre-twisting the wires, taping them, etc. Follow the manufacturers directons. Some connectors are designed for pre-twisting, some are not. The box should also list the allowable wire combinations. For example, the Ideal Manufacturing orange, blue and gray wirenuts are not listed for conductors larger than #14, so you should use a yellow when connecting to a #12.
Hope this helps.
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If you cant install a wirenut, DO NOT TOUCH ELECTRICAL WIRING. Hire an electrician !!!!!
On 18 Aug 2004 12:11:25 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Steve Nekias) wrote:

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