Wiremold Mount for Ceiling Fan


We are moving to an apartment where we do not have access to the space above the ceiling.
Is there a recommended method of using wiremold fittings to mount a ceiling fan?
TIA
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*Wiremold does make a surface mount ceiling box rated for fans. Part #V5738AF
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On Wed 30 Jun 2010 04:22:08a, John Grabowski told us...

Thanks, Jhn, for the specific part number.
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Nothing special, but be sure the box is mounted solid, and be sure to use the "wiremold" ceiling fan box, not the fixture box
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On Wed 30 Jun 2010 04:30:43a, RBM told us...

Thanks. I hadn't actually looked at the available parts yet, and didn't realize they made a specific ceiling fan box. I have used wiremold products many times, however.
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On Tue 29 Jun 2010 11:26:27p, Smitty Two told us...

Thanks, and funny you should mention #3. Until now I haven't lived in an apartment for 3 decdes, but when I did, I painted, wallpapered, tiled, ran electrical, and others things. I never had a problem.
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I own a "investment" property.
As a landlord, the single MOST important thing is that the tenant pays the rent on time.
Once you get started, it's just not that big of a deal to patch holes in the wall, for example.
As a tenant you should know that for residential leases, "fixtures" (and that includes the ceiling fan) become the property of the owner as soon as they are installed. Likely the landlord will tout the ceiling fan you installed as the best thing since sliced bread. I know that's what I would do.
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On 07/02/10 07:01 pm, John Gilmer wrote:

ISTR reading that there is a difference between items that are nailed in place and items that are screwed in place -- although this may have been in English law -- and it seemed counter-intuitive: screwed items become the property of the property owner, whereas nailed items remain the property of the tenant.
Anything like that in US laws? Just wondering.
Perce
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On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 20:02:42 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

In generally, you have it backwards. Widgets attached with screws are removable without damaging the structure.

Of course the landlord can demand that the building be restored to its original condition, give or take some normal wear and dirt.
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On 07/02/10 08:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

That would seem logical, but it's not what I think I recall reading.
If what you say is true, the ceiling fan under discussion would *not* become the property of the building owner (as John Gilmer contends). The box, wiring and bracket would, but not the fan.

Perce
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On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 21:59:39 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I think you recall incorrectly.

That depends. If it is removed and all damage to the structure repaired, I'd guess "no". It's usually easier and cheaper to leave it, though. Even that wouldn't mitigate any damages, should the landlord decide to push the issue. Unless the tenant has written permission to modify the building it really is a crap-shoot.
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"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote

US law can vary a bit on this as rental 'laws' tend to be state driven but the commonality here is the owner can require it all be returned to exactly as it was before, down to same original fixture. They can even demand the work be done by a professional. Its common in rental agreements to say all electrical and plumbing work has to be done by a licensed professional.
The way to work it is to get approval first from the owner. Usually they are happy to have a fan installed but they may want to see the model first (and may even purchase it for you). This has more to do with avoiding having that 'adorable baby room fan with the cute little hanging cherubs windchime' in the second bedroom, when the next tenant has teenagers.
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Right, except that as the landlord you are totally uncertain whether or not the ceiling fan your tenant installed was installed properly and in a safe manner... As a homeowner, you are allowed to do certain types of work on property which you OWN without a trade license... That right DOES NOT apply to property to which you pay for the right to occupy but DO NOT OWN...
Do you want the liability as the landlord for the safety of the entire property to rest on the hands of the modifications made by one tenant? I mean, wiring and making sure the box itself is properly attached to adequate structure... How do you know the work was done properly and the electrical connections were made according to code and the power tapped from a source which can feed it safely?
If it catches on fire, or falls off the ceiling and lands on your next tenant, you the landlord are the responsible party, not the tenant who installed it, as you are the one charged with maintaining your rental property in a safe habitable condition in order to keep renting it... The tenant is only responsible for keeping it clean according to the health codes, not damaging your rental property and paying the rent on time...
This is why most landlords are specifically anal retentive about such things... A single family house becomes more than a single family house when it is used as rental property as more safety rules and regulations often apply to rentals than owner occupied structures...
~~ Evan
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On 07/02/2010 10:41 PM, Evan wrote:

I've rented several places where the landlord has been totally cool with my fixing stuff for him, and even reimbursed me for parts. My stuff got fixed and he didn't have to come over. Of course my experiences may not be typical.
nate
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On Fri 02 Jul 2010 04:01:52p, John Gilmer told us...

That won't happen in this place. I've already checked, and the only they take possession of is if you want a security door installed. They split the cost of the door and provide the installation. They keep the door. Nothing else you add applies.
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