Wire nut w/5 #12

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Can someone tell me the best way to wire-nut 5 #12 wires in a 4x4" box. I know that a red nut will accept 5 #12 solid wires, but is there a better way ? I have seen posts that talk about con-blocks and others that talk about compression nuts. I can't find either at HomeDepot or any other big box.
Any help is appreciated.
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Chocolate block.
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I know Radio Shack (and others) sell these for low voltage connections but are they NEC approved for house wiring?
I Googled them and all the sites that carry larger sizes seem to be in the UK or NZ.
I was first introduced to them while serving in the USCG in Germany back in the late seventies, but again, only for low voltage apps.
Are they NEC approved to be used in the application the OP described?
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sid wrote:

You could also use a small copper split-bolt and (assuming it's not a grounding wire) wrap it with tape.
If I was using a wire-nut, I'd go one size bigger than red (don't remember what color that is, blue?)
Bob
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split bolt and tape.
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Sorry for hijacking...
Had to laugh when viewing that page. Main item: wire nuts. Suggested Related items: Two diamond circular saw blades and a Bosch drill/driver.
Gotta love software (or more likely, keyword coding) that comes up with that combination. And I've seen ridiculous suggestions on plenty of other sites and pages.
Amazon usually has relevant suggestions, but I've seen some crazy ones there too.
One of the most memorable goofy suggestions was at Cabellas or some other big sportsman store. I was searching for combination sunscreen and bug repellant, which it found. The related item it suggested was a 5 pack of pitons (the things mountain climbers pound into rocks to secure lines).
Why even bother having such a feature if it can't work better than that?
Paul F.
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wrote:

.
Just hijacking along...
re: The related item it suggested was a 5 pack of pitons (the things mountain climbers pound into rocks to secure lines).
Makes sense to me. The last thing I want to have happen when hanging off a cliff a couple of hundred feet above some jagged rocks is for a mosquito to start gnawing on my neck.
Bug repellent and mountain climbing gear go hand in hand. <g>
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sid wrote:

HomeCheepo sells a quality brand so you may need to stop at a real supply house.
http://www.idealindustries.com/products/wire_termination/twist-on/wingtwist.jsp
WT53 is a good choice.
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Problem there of course is buying a bag of 100 when I'm guessing the OP needs - dare I say - 1.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

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sid wrote:

Strip off 1" or better, get a real good twist with a GOOD pair of flat nosed pliers, then solder, then cut back to 1/2" to 3/4" of soldered wire showing and tape well.
s
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On 8/26/2009 7:49 AM Steve Barker spake thus:

Surprised to see someone make that suggestion.
Yes, it would definitely be a superior connection, both electrically and mechanically. But aside from the extra work involved, it has the problem of not being easily un-doable in case some future electrician needs to fix or add something.
Kind of like the old Western Union splices ...
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 10:31:09 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Ever try to open a crimped connector and add a wire?

--
Mr.E

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On 8/26/2009 11:39 AM snipped-for-privacy@totally.invalid spake thus:

No, but I've undone wire-nutted connections and added/moved wires.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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David Nebenzahl wrote:

If you did it right, there's enough wire there to do that 3 or 4 times.
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It would appear that cutting back the wires after soldering would violate NEC 110.14(B): "Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically secure without solder and then be soldered."
Also, NEC 250.148(E) prohibits relying on solder for the grounding conductor (EGC): "Connections depending solely on solder shall not be used."
Cheers, Wayne
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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 18:24:58 +0000 (UTC), Wayne Whitney

Twist to sufficient length, trim, then solder and tape.
Bundle, serve with #12 or #14 then solder and tape.

Key word here is "solely" as making mechanically and electrically secure followed by solder is not "solely".
This was done to prevent just placing the conductors in contact and soldering.
--
Mr.E

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Sounds fine, as long as the conductors are still mechanically secure after trimming.

I have a couple issues with this interpretation. First, it makes 250.148(E) purely redundant to 110.14(B). Second, under your interpretation, why add the solder at all? Just twist to be mechanically and electrically secure. So instead, I take "depending solely on solder" to mean "consists only of the conductors plus the solder".
Here's a clearer citation on the prohibition of soldering for the grounding conductor that is new to the 2008 NEC: 250.8(A) says "Permitted Methods. Grounding conductors and bonding jumpers shall be connected by one of the following means:" and then does not include soldering in the list of acceptable methods.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 20:09:59 +0000 (UTC), Wayne Whitney

without twisting does not. Soldered without twisting does not.
Soldering is NOT a mechanical connection under the code.
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