Window Repair Question: Glaze or Wood Framed?

My house was built in 1984. I have windows which consist of 6 indivdual small glass windows about 8" x 5" each on the bottom window and the same on top in a window frame. Each window is filled, or at least was filled, with argon gas or the like when the house was new. Some of them now have leaked and are a white haze color. I don't want to get totally new windows. What I want to do is repair the ones that have leaked. I've been looking on the net and on tv about how to glaze windows, etc. Each time I see it involves glazing. I look at the exterior of each window and it looks like each of my windows has a small wooden frame around each one window..kind of like a picture frame. Is this possible? They have several coats of paint on them, so I can't see if there are any nails or recesses for nails. I haven't torn into one yet, but I wanted to see if anyone knew whether windows where made like this. I may end up having to buy an electric miter saw, because if they are each framed with wood, I know I can't get them off w/o breaking them. Thanks in advance.
Pat
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:42:43 GMT, "Patrick"

I'm not so sure what you're describing, but it sounds like you have wooden sash (window frames) with individual thermopane lites (window panes). This would be pretty unusual but not unheard of. I have never seen thermopanes installed with glazing compound and I'd guess you do have lites installed with wooden stops as you described. I'd suggest scraping the paint back from one to see what you're dealing with and maybe trying to pry the stops up gently to see how hard it is. You might also call some glass shops to price the replacement panes. If you have a lot of failed thermopanes it might cost more than it's worth to replace just the lites. Windows could be cheaper especially if you consider the labor involved. Call more than one glass shop, as prices can vary a lot.
I have replaced thermopanes successfully but always in metal sashes. One thing I've learned is to find out from the supplier what sealants are compatable with the new thermopane windows. It can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and the wrong sealant can cause the thermopane to fail again.
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Patrick,
I think that what you are describing are windows in which there are a number of small glass panes called lights. Each light is individually made and placed in the window frame, several glazier points hold the light in place, the light is then sealed in place with window putty. After the whole window is repaired you'll need to paint it. Your local library will have home repair books with detailed instructions on how to do this. You'll need to find a source for the small panes of argon glass. A putty knife, glazier points, and window putty will be available at any hardware store. Last time I glazed a window I used a silicon caulk made for windows. It was very easy to use. Removing the old lights is usually not hard. Use the putty knife to break out the old putty, pry out the glazier points with a screwdriver or use needle nose pliers, and the pane should come free.
Good luck, Dave M.
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:42:43 GMT, "Patrick"

If your original windows are in fact low-e gas filled then what you "see" might not be what it actually is. I would recommend before you actually tackle one (and perhaps destroy an otherwise good window, you have a window restorer take a look.
See if you have a representative of BiGlass (www.biplass.com) a company which has a process that will restore or rebuild windows.
I had all the original 6 over 6's and 8 over 8's in my 1969 house rebuild by them into thermopane glass. They still look like the originals and many of the frame parts are the same, but the working components as well as the glass are completely new.
Good luck.
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