Window Glass / knee wall code

We had a vaulted ceiling in our home and several years ago we put a floor in to add an extra room area. It gave us about 120 square feet of space in the home on the second floor. We knew at the time the second floor window glass might need to be changed to tempered glass for safety reasons.
With the floor finished, the knee wall and glass frame is about 9 inches tall from the floor. Some people I speak with say it should be about 10 inches high and others say 18 inches to avoid the need for tempered glass.
Now we are selling the house and want to make any glass change if we have to, but only if necessary. The buyer's inspector will bring this up in his report. The new buyer is getting their own glass people to evaluate this matter and I would like other opinions.
I'm posting some pictures and the link, to show what I'm talking about. I would appreciate any comments as to the knee wall / glass.
First floor Living Room ceiling:
http://www.oren.org/Del%20MIra%20Living%20Room.jpg
Second floor Loft with windows.
http://www.oren.org/Del%20Mira%20Loft.jpg
Thanks,
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What do / does the code enforcemen folks in your locality say is actually _required_ reagarding the glass? What answer do you get at the permits offce? You did pull a permit when you did the work, didn't you? You had an engineer or architect go o do th plans for that floor so that its certain that the floor is both strog enough and not pusing he supporting walls out, right?
Didn't think so.
building inspecor
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 10:13:58 -0700, "Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote:

No it is NOT permitted. The buyer is happy with the "documentation" disclosed during the offer/counter. The were happy, so am I.
The floor is not a problem, period.
Thanks,
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would find out how much it would cost to replace the glass, and be prepared to lower the price of the house by that much if the buyer wants you to. (but don't mention it unless asked.)
If I was buying the house, I'd be wanting to change those windows into arches, and therefore wouldn't be interested in you spending money to upgrade what's there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's already a discussion and I am prepared for changing out the glass. The buyer still needs to send the inspection report; stating what they want fixed and the "tempered" glass will surely be the only main concern for the sell.

In fact we had planned (desired ) to have arched windows. We lived in this house 11 years, but found a home that made us move.
I will mention to the buyer about the idea of arched windows, but since they intend to rent the home I doubt they will make the change. My only obligation will be to ensure the proper glass is in the window.
Thanks,
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would require safety glazing if it were mine. The thought of kids sliding on that shiny wood floor in their stocking feet and sliding right into or through one of those windows would keep me awake at night.
I think code will require it also, though the AHJ will make the final determination. Reference this site: http://www.glazingcodes.org/glazingincode/regulatingglass.html
here are some quotes:
a.. Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel where the exposed area of an individual pane is greater than 9 square feet and the exposed bottom edge is less than 18 inches above the floor, the exposed top edge is greater than 36 inches above the floor, and one or more walking surface(s) are within 36 inches horizontally of the plane of the glazing. Exceptions include a panel with a protective bar (1-1/2 inches or more in height and capable of withstanding a horizontal load of 50 pounds per linear foot without contacting the glass installed on the accessible sides of the glazing 34 inches to 38 inches above the floor), and an outboard pane in insulating glass units or multiple glazing where the bottom exposed edge of the glass is 25 feet or more above any grade, roof, walking surface of other horizontal or sloped surface adjacent to the glass interior.
a.. Glazing adjacent to stairways, landings and ramps when it is within 36 inches horizontally of a walking surface, within 60 inches horizontally of a bottom tread of a stairway in any direction, and the bottom edge is less than 60 inches above the plane of the adjacent walking surface (or stairway, measured from the nose of the tread).
______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.