Wind chill and frozen pipes again

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Weather forecast for this week is windy, gusts up to 45 MPH, and also temps near zero F.
Will the wind chill make it more likely for me to freeze pipes? Compared to still air?
When it's near zero F, and winds of 45 MPH, should I leave a faucet dripping?
Would it be better to leave a hot drip, or a cold drip?
What was the agreement, last time I asked? I think we all on the list agreed about our answers.
I vaguely remember someone called me an idiot.
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 6:35:58 AM UTC-6, Stormin Mormon wrote:

It all depends how intent you are to freeze them...best of luck!
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On 1/20/2014 7:55 AM, Bob_Villa wrote:

OTOH, boring can be good thing. I'd rather be warm and bored indoors, compared to using a heat gun in +2F cold wind.
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On 1/20/2014 7:35 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The routine here is to surround mobile home with straw bales, leave faucets running at a trickle, leave cabinet doors open. Good luck.
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On 1/20/2014 7:59 AM, Norminn wrote:

If the pipes freeze, close the cabinet doors and light the bales on fire?
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On 1/20/2014 9:46 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

LOL. The point is to keep colder air out....a line of bales all around the perimeter of the home would hold some of the heat lost from pipes and floor inside the space, I presume. With faucets running slowly, that would likely add at least more heat to the space than minus-degree wind blowing through.
When I lived in a house on slab and without much insulation, the prevailing north wind in winter made floors and walls at north end much cooler.
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On 1/21/2014 11:49 AM, Norminn wrote:

Today is going to be in the cold end of the spectrum. High near 7F, and cold, well, colder. Reminds me, I've got some cardboard to apply here and there, to help with the cold blast. I mean, draft.
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On 01/20/2014 06:35 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

It was stated numerous times that water freezes at 32 degrees F
and if the temp is above 32F no matter what the wind chill is... the temp is still above 32F and the pipes will not freeze.
Wind chill is nothing more than how the body perceives the temperature.
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 7:16:11 AM UTC-6, philo  wrote:

This is too logical for this thread/forum/poster...please take your common sense elsewhere! 8^)
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On 01/20/2014 07:33 AM, Bob_Villa wrote:

Yeah I know.
Maybe we should discuss windshield temp.
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On 1/20/2014 8:33 AM, Bob_Villa wrote:

where! 8^)

By golly, that means stuff won't freeze over 32F? Really? Supposed to get into the single digits in the next couple days.
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 8:16:11 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

It's been stated numerous times that wind chill also affects how heat is removed from any object that is above ambient temp. And hence on a night when the windchill is 5F and the actual outdoor temp is 25, pipes may freeze in certain circumstances when they will not freeze if it were 25F with no windchill.
Simple question. There is an unheated cabin or a house with a drafty crawlspace. Two cases:
A - The forecast if for temps overnight to dip down to 25, no windchill.
B - The forecast is for temps overnight to dip down to 25, 5F windchill.
That's all the info you have.
Do you believe the probability of water pipes freezing is equal in both cases, yes or no?
BTW, thanks for taking the obvious bait from Stormin and starting this all over again.
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 8:11:13 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It would be nil in both cases since the threshold is below 20 degrees for pipes to burst. BTW, you have also taken the bait! *L*
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 9:23:00 AM UTC-5, Bob_Villa wrote:

You failed the test. The question was about *freezing*, not bursting.

No, I only responded after philo decided to start this discussion all over again. I saw the other responses and was going to say nothing to start it up again, as did other posters. But if philo wants to go over it again, then here we are.
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On Mon, 20 Jan 2014 06:23:00 -0800 (PST), Bob_Villa

How can that be. Water expands iirc between 33 and 32^F. So it reaches its greatest volume at 32. What does 20 have to do with it?
I know that warmer things surrounding the water continue to heat the water, but that's only if the things are warmer. They are losing heat too for the same reason the water is.

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On Monday, January 20, 2014 1:19:25 PM UTC-6, micky wrote:

From the old post:
"This has nothing to do with wind chill...but it gives you pretty much the magic number for a pipe to burst. From "The Weather Channel"!
When should homeowners be alert to the danger of freezing pipes? That depen ds, but in southern states and other areas where freezing weather is the ex ception rather than the rule (and where houses often do not provide adequat e built-in protection), the temperature alert threshold is 20°F.
This threshold is based upon research conducted by the Building Research Co uncil at the University of Illinois. Field tests of residential water syste ms subjected to winter temperatures demonstrated that, for un-insulated pip es installed in an unconditioned attic, the onset of freezing occurred when the outside temperature fell to 20°F or below.
This finding was supported by a survey of 71 plumbers practicing in souther n states, in which the consensus was that burst-pipe problems began to appe ar when temperatures fell into the teens. (Note: Please disregard any wind chill! *J*)"
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On Mon, 20 Jan 2014 16:04:20 -0800 (PST), Bob_Villa

We are talking pipes in and under a "redneck bungalow" - close to ground level. My guess is 20F is about 5 degrees late on a breezy day and 7 degrees late on a windy one.
A good row of hay bales around the bottom of the trailer before the snow fell would have helped considerably - likely making 25F safe. Mabee better. And a couple of 100 watt bulbs would then help keep them from feezing to quite a bit lower temp. Then again, I don't know just how BAD Stormy's trailer is. I know some I've seen down around Ellicotville and south would hardly pass as chicken coops up here. Likely cost twice as much to heat as my 3 bedroom two story.up here in Central Ontario
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 10:58:57 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

exception rather than the rule (and where houses often do not provide adeq uate built-in protection), the temperature alert threshold is 20�F.

stems subjected to winter temperatures demonstrated that, for un-insulated pipes installed in an unconditioned attic, the onset of freezing occurred w hen the outside temperature fell to 20�F or below.

ppear when temperatures fell into the teens.

+1 The poster took what is clearly offered as a general guideline for outside temps and freezing pipes in an *attic* and made it appear it applies to freezing pipes in general. If you have a piece of exposed pipe filled with water outside, I agree that I would expect it could easily freeze and bust long before 20F.
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On 1/20/2014 10:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've not seen hay bales any where else in the trailer park, not sure it's allowed. I'd have to ask, some time. Might be able to rig some thing with fiberglass, behind the skirting.
Some years ago, a couple friends and I blew cellulose into the ceiling, and that helped a lot. Used to have icicles down to the ground. From the lost heat.
When I go out for more than an hour or so, I turn down the heat to 60F, figure that cuts my heat bill a bit. Only runs two or three minutes to recover when I get back. Sometimes, I'll light a stove burner during the warmup period.
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On Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:08:47 -0500, Stormin Mormon

with 1 inch lumber,sealed with typar (on the inside) and backed with 3 inches of insulation and the temperature under his trailer never got below 42F - even when it is -40 out and blowing up a storm. He is on dry sand. He just installed an outdoor boiler to heat the trailer and his new shop - and running the heat line under the trailer heats the "crawlspace" enough that the floor is warm and the circulator fan on the heat exchanger (in the "furnace" hardly runs. It is an OLD trailer - was 2X3 framed - he built another 2X3 wall inside the living room and added 3 inches of insulation, as well as 6inches or more extra in the roof - the kitchen and bedrooms are still the original 3" walls and standard roof insulation. He is hoping to get the new house built next summer.
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