will electrical inspectors looking at recent work scrutinize old work and require changes?

I'm considering doing some wiring myself. As I poke around the innards of my house I've found various examples of previous homeowner wiring that doesn't meet code. I haven't seen anything dangerous, but it wouldn't have passed an inspection had one been sought.
I'm sure many old homes must have things like this. My question is what happens if I call for an inspection to look at work *I've* done, but this inspection will bring the inspector within view of work that was done before I bought the house that isn't quite right (e.g. an NM cable strung across an attic space instead of being stapled to joists). Will that inspector require everything old they find that isn't up to code to be fixed before they approve of the new work?
I know this may vary from place to place but wondered what general thoughts were.
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Well, there's your answer.
In many cases, the inspector is bound by inspection of the permitted section only. A good inspector would at least point out the problems and ask that they be brought up to code. If it was my, I'd get the permit, call the inspector and when he arrives, let him know that other changes need to be done and he may help you by showing you the best way to meet the code. Or he may just be a prick.
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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 08:46:14 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

Generally speaking they only look at the permitted work but no inspector with a conscience can walk away if he sees a dangerous situation.
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On Dec 12, 11:46 am, snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

Ditto to the other postings; I've recently asked this of the local inspection authority and they were pretty clear: they will inspect just the new work, but will not ignore unrelated stuff that's obviously and immediately dangerous.
However, a few years back I was getting an inspection of new kitchen wiring, and as the inspector was eyeballing things he asked if my gas piping was grounded. This had nothing to do with the new kitchen circuits. It appeared not to be and he said I should ground the gas pipe to the water main; he helped pick a good spot to do it. I didn't push him on whether he'd pass my kitchen without it, I just said sure, thanks, and that was it.
So I would be prepared for such helpful advice.
Chip C Toronto
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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 10:36:40 -0800 (PST), Chip C

That is what you should expect if the inspector is really doing his job. Inspectors are supposed to be working with the installer to get a safe installation, not just wielding unchecked power. When I was building my pool the inspectors would tell me about things I should be thinking about AFTER they signed the permit, so there was no doubt this was advice, not mandates. States that have instiituted inspector licensing and required continuing education are moving away from some of the old problems that plagued our industry.
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wrote:

Most inspectors are pretty reasonable. When I got my new service hooked up, the inspector dinged me on a couple of small items that he wanted changed, but he was not a prick about it. He signed off on the permit and allowed the POCO to go ahead and hook up the house, even though I had not made the changes he requested yet. I changed the things he asked for and life is good!
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Thanks for all the feedback. I would welcome any information from the inspector about things that could/should be changed, especially anything that might be dangerous. I don't think I have any of the latter, but if I did I'd want to know about it. I just didn't want some bad (but not dangerous) practices by previous homeowners to derail me from my current project.
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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 21:22:36 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

You will probably be dissapointed that you think he didn't look hard enough at your project. These guys are usually worked too hard to spend too much time there. They usually have a few things they look at and they move on.
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On Dec 13, 8:27 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yeah, this happened to me on that kitchen I mentioned. I was all prepped to show off my splices, answer code questions, trace the circuits, like a kid at a 4-H show. The inspector stuck his head into the kitchen for like three seconds, never set foot through the door, and said "looks fine. let's see the panel".
I think thre's a few glaring errors they look for and they can spoth them pretty fast. Of course,just having the work inspected sets you into an elite minority.
Chip C Toronto
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I've heard from a couple local electricians that the inspector in my town is a major PITA to deal with. They said that he will require all kinds of things to be done that aren't part of the permitted work, and that he never approves anything or trusts anyone to do anything right. They further described instances where they had done things according to code and the inspector required it changed because he just didn't like it---regardless of the code. I was told that some electricians charge a hefty extra fee to work in my town just because of this guy, and had one electrician propose not getting a permit at all. (I think this also helps explain why so many electricians just never return my call)
I've really been leaning towards doing this work myself (w/ inspection) but this gives me pause. I of course would want anything dangerous to be pointed out and required corrected, but other things, just because they don't meet current code (and aren't part of the permitted work), is not something I want to deal with.
One example an electrician told me is that this inspector will require every bedroom to be wired with wired smoke detectors, all on the same wiring run, even if the work being done has nothing to do with bedrooms. This is all for a 50 year old house.
So what are people's thoughts on going without an inspection? I hate to do it but also don't want to open myself up to unnecessary work beyond what I'm planning.
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What exactly are you planning on doing?
On Dec 22, 4:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

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On Dec 22, 4:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

installing a subpanel on the 2nd floor and running several circuits from it. i have a clear path from the panel to the circuit locations (attic access behind the wall) and a path figured out for the feeder cable. i'll feed the panel from the main with a 60A over 6/3 and run about 7 20A 120v circuits using 12/2. i can pull an unused 40A double- pole breaker from the main to accommodate the new feeder breaker. i know to keep the neutral and ground isolated in the sub. however, this is the first time i've done something this extensive wiring-wise.
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