Why did dishwashers switch to "garden hose" 3/4" inlet from 3/8" compression fitting?

I was installing a new dishwasher last night. When I got to the supply line connection I was amazed to see that the dishwasher had a plastic 3/4" "garden hose" male fitting rather than what I thought was the standard 3/8" compression fitting. So this morning I had to make a trip to HD to pick up a "Garden Hose Dishwasher Elbow" <http://www.keeneymfg.com/featured_products/33-Garden-Hose-Dishwasher-Elbow which of course it took three people to find.
Apparently Whirlpool made this change on all of their dishwashers in 2009 (Maytag, Amana, Kitchen Aid, Whirlpool, and Jenn-Air). I'm sure there must be a reason for it, but it seems like a ridiculous design.
How much did they save by using a molded plastic 3/4" garden hose connector versus a metal compression fitting? The adapter was only $3.36, but it was annoying that I couldn't finish the installation until the next morning.
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wrote:

Guess it was a bad week for dishwashers [or a good one for folks who sell them<g>] My had a spectacularly stinky end-- the whole electronics panel fried. At least is wasn't some $100 part that I'd have to consider replacing on my 10 yr old machine.
I got my new one from an old family appliance store- [Marcella's in Schenectady]. When I went to the warehouse the guy handed me that fitting & I looked puzzled-- he says; 'you're going to need it- you'll see why.'
A few more reasons to keep those old family businesses going. I actually paid less for the Whirlpool than Lowes was selling them for-- They had it in stock- it is warranted by *their* repair guys for a year-- And the warehouse dude gave a $4 part that saved me an hour of dicking around at Lowed/HD/local plumbing place.

As it turned out, mine was a 2-day job, too-- but through no fault of the seller. They moved the rear support, too, so I had to cut a new hole for the drain hose--- Then I had a leaker. . . .
If anything, I think the new design is more likely to leak, and cost more to manufacture-- but what do I know?
But isn't it fun?
Jim
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I expect they were having problems with people complaining that if you undid that compression fitting connection (to move the dishwasher out for service, say), it could be a problem getting that connection not to leak when you redid it.
The problem now is that rubber supply hoses to dish washers are gonna burst just as often as rubber supply hoses to clothes washing machines.
If I were you, I would replace the rubber hose to your dishwasher with a braided stainless steel hose, just like the ones they make for clothes washing machines.
--
nestork


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wrote:

That hose must have been rubbing against something that cut through the braid. Water pressure didn't break those stainless steel strands.

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On 12/10/2012 12:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@at.biz wrote:

I sort of wonder if it was bent over a sharp edge? O_o
TDD
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"SMS" wrote in message
I was installing a new dishwasher last night. When I got to the supply line connection I was amazed to see that the dishwasher had a plastic 3/4" "garden hose" male fitting rather than what I thought was the standard 3/8" compression fitting. So this morning I had to make a trip to HD to pick up a "Garden Hose Dishwasher Elbow" <http://www.keeneymfg.com/featured_products/33-Garden-Hose-Dishwasher-Elbow which of course it took three people to find.
Apparently Whirlpool made this change on all of their dishwashers in 2009 (Maytag, Amana, Kitchen Aid, Whirlpool, and Jenn-Air). I'm sure there must be a reason for it, but it seems like a ridiculous design.
How much did they save by using a molded plastic 3/4" garden hose connector versus a metal compression fitting? The adapter was only $3.36, but it was annoying that I couldn't finish the installation until the next morning.
We replaced our WP DW that was 14 years old with another WP. It had that same set up. Looks like the first place to start leaking. WW
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I have installed 5 dishwashers over the many years that I have owned a dishwasher. EVERY dishwasher that I installed had a different arrangement. The plumbing and electrical connections were in different locations with different clearances for the connections to the house plumbing and power. This was with the same brands but different years. I have always converted the electrical connection to a heavy duty cord and plug, and used a flex hose for the water supply. Even with flexible connections I have had to move or adjust the water supply and electric supply on every install to fit where the manufacturer provided a space for them to exist.
The last one I installed was a Bosch and it used a 3/8" compression female thread to connect to the supply with the electric valve attached very close to the water connection so that the hose to the machine is not pressurized when not in use.
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