Why are there 15- and 20-amp receptacles?

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On Nov 13, 5:57pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Seems to me you just took one out to dinner.
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On 11/13/2010 5:21 PM, Roy Quijano wrote:

You can watch a troll eat here:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/2vdzx67
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 15:21:11 -0800 (PST), Roy Quijano

No, Proteus, you're confusing me with your best friend, DimBulb. You're confused a *lot*.
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wrote:

20-amp
you
device.
20
<That is a stupid rule and a poor observance by the code enforcement community. A 20 amp receptacle on a 15 amp circuit endangers no one, as mentioned the circuit breaker will detect any overload and trip, now a 15 amp receptacle on 20 amp circuit is dangerous and will eventually brown out.>
Respectfully disagree. As TTD point out, it's quite possible for the circuit breaker to fail to operate for any number of reasons. In such cases trying to pull 20A through 15A rated wiring is just asking for serious trouble, IMHO.
-- Bobby G.
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Bobby G you will have to wait for Roy Qs response but I don't think that is what he implied. I am just around to collect some lost souls :/ Tecumseh The Ghost in the Machine
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You have the right to your opinion. I don't think you'll find awg#14 on a household circuit designed for outlets, which would be the only case where the wiring should not exceed 15 amps., he most likely has 12awg which is rated for 20 amps and safe to operate a 20A receptacle.
The rule is innaplicable in such case as I mentioned above, because the outlet supersedes the protective circuits rating...not the protection itself.
Don't believe the hype or any damn ghost stories. Roy Q.T.
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On 11/13/2010 06:19 PM, Roy Quijano wrote:

Huh? I can't remember ever living in a house which used anything BUT 14AWG for general recep ckts.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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wrote:

a
if
can
cases
<<You have the right to your opinion.>>
Indeed I do, and in this case it appears to coincide with one of the prinicipal purposes of having a NEC in the first place - preventing people from designing/installing potentially dangerous wiring.
<<I don't think you'll find awg#14 on a household circuit designed for outlets, which would be the only case where the wiring should not exceed 15 amps., he most likely has 12awg which is rated for 20 amps and safe to operate a 20A receptacle.>>
Well, for one thing, the specifics of what I think are a hypothetical case ask is it safe to put a 20A receptacle on a 15A circuit? If it was using 12AWG, it wouldn't really be a 15A circuit. My pre-WWII house is lousy with 15A circuits and 14AWG wiring. I don't believe that wiring carries more current as it ages and oxidizes, but that the reverse is true. Drawing 20A through a 15A circuit seems antithetical to the whole purpose of the NEC. Yes we have fuses and circuit breakers, but they are meant to deal with accidents, emergencies and product failures, not wiring that's purposefully done incorrectly. It *may* protect against that, but it's clearly not its primary purpose.
-- Bobby G.
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MOVE OUT OF THERE IMMEDIATELY
PATECUMSEH
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Proteus wrote:

Roy Quijano is well known on alt.engineering.electrical for giving bad advice. This is an example.
Proteus is well known on alt.engineering.electrical for being a particularly stupid troll.
They are the same entity. In agreement with krw - ignore them.
--
bud--

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On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 09:14:41 -0800, Proteus wrote:
[snip]

Even without being overloaded?

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On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 13:49:34 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

The plugs are always fused in the UK, and of course domestic AC is always 240V, so there's largely no need to mess around with different outlet styles (there are some different plug and outlet types for very high draws, but those aren't generally seen in home situations, and things like electric stoves are normally hard-wired into a wall plate). Plug fuses there are usually 13A maximum, and if I remember right the maximum current draw on the ring circuit is around 30A.
I rather miss UK electrical installs - it's nice having 240V everywhere, and the components are generally to a much higher standard than in the US. The downside is that UK plugs are pretty huge, which creates issues for storage requirements (particularly for things like chargers for portable devices)
cheers
Jules
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On 11/12/2010 8:10 AM Jules Richardson spake thus:

So how does that work? What form factor are the fuses--glass tubes? cartridges? Easy to see if they're blown and replace them?
--
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On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 09:53:10 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

They're ceramic bodies I think - they're not transparent, so you can't obviously see if they've blown without checking them with a meter. They're about 1" in length and 1.4" in diameter (maybe exactly, but I'm going from memory).
cheers
Jules
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On 11/12/2010 11:09 AM Jules Richardson spake thus:

So the plugs must be huge. Yuck. Glad I live on this side of the pond (at least regarding electrical plugs).
--
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On 11/12/2010 2:42 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Back here in the US, I have an old Variac with a slightly large plug. It holds two 1/4" glass fuses that pop out and are easy to check and change. Pretty neat plug actually.
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On 11/12/2010 4:52 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

A lot of test equipment I've worked on has a socket, switch and fuse like this:
http://homanndesigns.com/store/images/iec_power.jpg
The circuit breaker in the electrical panel protects the building wiring not the equipment. The fuse in the power connector protects the piece of equipment.
TDD
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On 11/12/2010 3:36 PM The Daring Dufas spake thus:

Heh; don't they say that in some electronic equipment a $5 transistor is used to protect a 10-cent fuse?
--
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On 11/12/2010 11:44 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

None that I've seen but there are some very poor design practices out there. Many years ago I worked in TV shops (remember them?) and an old fellow I worked with was always growling about the design engineers who should be flogged for some of the crap they designed and how they should be forced to work on it. 8-)
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 01:07:11 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Why? The reality is that they don't want *anyone* working on it. It's a design requirement. ;-)
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