Whole house water filter installation

I want to install a whole hose water filter.
In my unfinished basement the water comes in from the street main directly below the the floor in a corner and the pipe runs up to just about the ceiling before branching to the water heater. I've got a shut-off valve on this piece running striaght up from the floor to ceiling and I'm think that this would be the only place to put a water filter.
As the water filter has input/output points in a horizontal fashion and the pipe is vertical what is the best way to hook it up? I guess I could sweat right angle bends in the pipe to come up around the side of the filter and something similar on the output side. Seems that it would look rather like a rats nest but there is no other way.
Suggestions?
Thanks, SJ
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SJ wrote:

Yes, put some EL's in it. Also, plan on a couple of ball valves to isolate the filter during changing cartridges. With a thrid valve you could add a bypass loop.
If you use much water for irrigation/sprinkling, all of that useage will go thru your filter unless you can locate it further downstream.
Check that the city water presure does not exceed the rating of the cartridge housing. Jim
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Worked for me. Elbow, filter, elbow up to a short length, elbow back to main line, elbow back up.
Even if the filter has a shut off to use when changing the cartridge, put another valve in anyway "just in case". Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Good idea for the plumbing except for the extra valve. Now if I were advising, I'd say buy a filter housing with the red pressure relief button and VIH (valve in head) with a clear sump. I've sold them for 15 years and none have failed like many of those sold in big box stores and supply houses. I'd also say not to buy any of those with the built in by-pass. And I wouldn't plumb a by-pass due to creating dead ends for bacteria to grow in.
But what is it and how much of it is in your water that you want to remove? Hopefully it isn't chlorine, that is a very bad idea.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Why is it a bad idea to remove chlorine? I am a fishkeeper and would love to be able to remove chlorine from at least one outlet, since fish and chlorine don't mix. And what could I use to do that? -rich
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an ro with a carbon block will remove chlorine and 95%+ of everything else. an ro/di will remove everything.
an ro/di is usually recommended for salt water tanks.
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On 9 Oct 2003 09:55:48 -0700, someone wrote:

'Cause chlorine kills (or at least reduces) bad germs that can make you sick.
Yours is that special case that somebody on the internet will always come up with to attack any general statement.
Okay, you don't want chlorine for your fish. But you should still have it in your pipes for other purposes.
BTW, I know there *IS* an alternate view on this, that chlorinated water does have indirect negative health effects (nope, don't know the details) when consumed, so if you feel that way drink bottled water. But net overall chlorine seems a proven way to keep public water supplies relatively safe from bacterial contamination.
-v.
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That is a bad idea on a whole house basis. The reason is due to the need for the chlorine to begin with. It is because of bacteria etc.. And when we use water we contaminate the faucets and water using appliances, which in turn can contaminate the water when the contamination migrates into the faucet tip etc.. That's why backflow prevention is so important.
For your need I'd suggest an inline GAC filter such as used on refrigerators and reverse osmosis units and a faucet end adapter with a length of like vinyl or PE tubing. I'd guess that type of 2.5" x 6" filter would last you a few months but it depends on how much water you run through it.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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On Thu, 09 Oct 2003 02:27:26 GMT, someone wrote:

glad to have it, and I don't see as big an issue as Gary does. (Actually, the "bypass" goes straight thru, it is the filter that is on a side loop.)
Its not like the inside of all one's pipes is actually scrubbed by a sufficiently high speed flow. There is plenty of opportunity for "slime" if it wants to grow. Many plumbing systems have blanked off tees or whatever, or even the little anti-water hammer end that starts out full of air but gets filled up time. Ever see a cut open street main that's been in place a while, down to 1/2 its original size from deposits. Every branch to a hydrant is a dead end, they are flushed less frquently than my bypass is (every time I change the filter).
I like the bypass, I never lose service to the other household members while changing the filter, and if I f' up the threads or something while changing it, I would still have service to make repairs at my leisure.
-v.
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I believe there is a change or one will be made soon to disallow those dead end end capped type arrestors. Other dead ends are not any better. They all prevent sanitizing efforts. Everyone with a plumbed by-pass, that's three manual valves, should be as diligent as v. Sorry to say that from my experience they aren't and there's all but 100% that never use the by-pass they insisted on plumbing in or being added by the installer, when they installed the filter. Or softener.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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