Where to store left over bricks

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My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be done with them?
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On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.
--
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I don't agree. Only the show face of a construction brick is water-resistant. The other five faces will absorb water readily. Unless the OP lives in an area where the outdoor temperature *never* drops below 32F/0C, bricks stored outdoors will be destroyed by spalling after a couple of winters. Paving bricks are a different story, of course, but that's not what the OP is talking about.
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Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing, some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far as just "wash them off" thats a crock of bs unless you dont care if the mortar might fail in 20 years, since when does mortar bond to dirt or mold, brick is porus he would have to acid wash them, and some types of brick change color with acid. They are best stored dry, inside or out and covered to keep off dirt.
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wrote:

Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing, some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far as just "wash them off" thats a crock of bs unless you dont care if the mortar might fail in 20 years, since when does mortar bond to dirt or mold, brick is porus he would have to acid wash them, and some types of brick change color with acid. They are best stored dry, inside or out and covered to keep off dirt.
I would tend to agree with Ransley atleast from what I've seen on jobsites...The bricks are delivered on pallets and shrink wrapped...Once on site they are covered with tarps or lumber covers as well....Buy a few pallets and tarps and you should be good....Why chance it unless using them as pavers is all you're gonna do...Around here(coastal Maine) old bricks bring a pretty penny...Alot of historic renovations and rich city folk who think old stuff is chic...LOL...There are 2 places near me that buys and sells old bricks , beams , barnboards , windows , doors , hardware , hardwood flooring , tubs , toilets ect. , ect. .....No need to fill up the land fill with them...I bet if you looked you would find somebody to buy and haul them off...Keep a few of course...
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What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to assembled brick walls?
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wrote:

Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...
PROTECTION
Storage of Materials
The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.
Source...gobrick.com Tecnical Notes....http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm
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Not all materials are equal. No mention of bricks, I can't assume that your cite has the slightest bearing on storing bricks.
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wrote:

Try READING the link...IT IS TALKING ABOUT BRICKS hence the name of the website gobrick.com and cites the Brick Institute of America.....
PROTECTION
Storage of Materials
The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.
Masonry Units. Masonry units should be stored off the ground to avoid contamination by dirt and by ground water which may contain soluble salts. They should also be covered by a water-resistant membrane to keep them dry.
Cementitious Materials. Cementitious materials for mortar should be stored off the ground and under cover.
Sand. Sand for mortar should also be stored on high ground, or ideally, off the ground to prevent contamination from dirt, organic materials and ground water, any of which may contribute to efflorescence and may be deleterious to mortar performance. In addition, it is advisable to store sand and other aggregates under a protective cover. This will avoid saturation and freezing in cold weather.
Flashing. Flashing materials should be stored in places where they will not be punctured or damaged. Plastic and asphalt coated flashing materials should not be stored in areas exposed to sunlight. Ultraviolet rays from the sun break down these materials, causing them to become brittle with time. Plastic flashing exposed to the weather at the site for months before installation should not be used. During installation, flashing must be pliable so that no cracks occur at corners or bends.
EVERYTHING is to be off the ground and covered....Atleast according to the experts of which I'm not ..From what I've seen over the last 20 years of being on jobsites , that's how the pro's do it as well ...Cite a website that says different....
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 18:31:38 -0600, AZ Nomad

The reference to Efflorescence perhaps? Peculiar to masonry products
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AZ Nomad wrote:

The "gobrick" in the URL (http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm ) didn't give you a clue?
--

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I didn't bother with the usl. I had made the silly assumption that the poster had quoted relevent material.
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wrote:

Next time, please leave a blank space before and after a url. That way it will be noticable -- I didn't see it either -- it will show up as a link in people's newsreaders, it will be a different color, and it will be clickable, like this
Notes.... http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm
But while you say "Try READING the link" you should try reading his post. It's all of 13 words and it asks about why unassembled bricks would deteriorate differerntly from assembeld bricks. Your link doesn't address that.
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wrote:

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wrote:

True it doesn't go into *why* just that you shouldn't store them outside on the ground uncovered which was the point of the thread....Same for an unfinished wall if you read down the page on the link.. Protection of Walls
Rain. Masonry walls exposed to weather and unprotected during construction can become so saturated with water that they may require weeks, or even months (depending upon climatic conditions), to dry out. This prolonged saturation may cause many of the slightly soluble salts to go into solution, thus raising the possibility of efflorescence. Such conditions may also contribute to the contamination of the masonry with soluble salts from elsewhere in the construction (concrete, concrete block, plaster, trim, etc.).
During construction, all walls should be kept dry by covering the top of the wall with a strong, water-resistant membrane at the end of each day or shutdown period. The covering should overhang the wall by at least 24 in. (610 mm) on each side, and should be secured against wind. The covering should remain in place until the top of the cavity wall is completed or protected by adjacent materials.
Freezing. Leaky walls can sometimes be attributed to the freezing of mortar before it has set, or the lack of protection of materials and walls during cold weather construction. Therefore, when building in cold weather, all materials and walls should be properly protected against freezing. This involves the following items: storing of materials, preparation of mortar, heating of masonry units, laying precautions, and protection of work. Technical Notes 1 Series, "Cold Weather Masonry Construction," contains recommendations for construction and protection of masonry during freezing weather. ACI-ASCE 530.1 Specifications for Masonry Structures also has requirements for cold weather construction..
After the wall is done and a sealent applied it is fine ?? I was told by the mason who topped off my chimney to seal it....Perhaps somebody else will chime in as to why....Thanks for the tip on links...
http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm
Just practicing...LOL..
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:06:40 -0600, AZ Nomad

Assembled brick walls are protected from water entry at the top, and open to drain at the bottom - so do not saturate with water - which then freezes.
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The frenchies in quebec cause quite a stir.

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re: "The frenchies in quebec cause quite a stir. "
OK, since I've scored a hat-trick here, I'll tell my story:
1 - My grandfather was French - Canadian 2 - My grandfather was a mason 3 - My grandfather built entire houses from used brick.
My grandfather was a mason in Massachusetts where he helped build the huge brick paper factories in Holyoke.
Back in those days, left over bricks and bricks from demolitions were either free or pennies per hundred.
2 of the houses that he lived in were built from brick that he scarfed up from construction and/or demolition sites.
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Oh, definitely hold on to them. You are quite right, as soon as they are gone you will need them. Say, water gets behind a wall, freezes, and cracks a few. Or ivy peels the face off a couple dozen. Or he or the next owner wants to change a window, or redo a failed chimney stack. Basement or crawlspace available? One annoying day getting them down there, and then forget about them till needed. Probably no more time than hauling them to the landfill, unless he has a truck. Stacked flat 7 or 8 high along one wall, like in the furnace room, they will not take up much usable footprint. If he has storage shelves in basement, they can go behind and under the bottom shelf. If he has the space, dry-stack them carefully interlaced into a couple pedestals, throw a solid door over the top, and use as a workbench. Always a good idea to keep some spares on hand for stuff like that. (oddball trim, wierd electrical plates, ceramic tile, kitchen drawer pulls, etc.)
If his heart is set on getting rid of them, at least donate them to Habitat ReStore or something.
-- aem sends....
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And if he doesn't have storage shelves in the basement, he can use the bricks and a few 1x10s to make storage shelves...
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