Where to get thermostat for Craftmaster electric water heater?

It's ten years old, it just stopped heating the water, and I'd like to try to repair it myself before paying a repairman. But where to get the part in a reasonable time frame? Home Depot says they don't carry it.
It's a Craftmaster model E1E4ORDO45. If I have to buy a whole new one, I'd want a plug-in replacement. I don't want to fiddle with welded copper pipes.
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Rowland wrote:

I think you mean soldered copper pipes? http://www.cornerhardware.com/item_212719/Plumbing/Water-Heaters-Parts/Water-Heater-Parts/Craftmaster-Electric-Element-Kit.html
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dude, for someone who seems to want to stop spamming, you are sure doing a good job of spamming.
randy
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Well, I guess I know where not to go for helpful advice.
Don't feel too bad, folks. The guy at Home Depot didn't know they were "universal" either.
It's my .sig and I'll put what I want in it. If that offends somebody, I'll worry about that when I run across someone here who knows enough about water heaters to be worth not offending.
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Repeat the mantra Google is my friend...Google is my friend...Google is my friend...
This page: http://www.waterheaterparts.net/cgi-bin/shopper.exe?keywords=electstat&search ¬tion is on the parts website for the company that made your heater, American Water Heater Company. There is a good chance that, since they sell parts online and these are the only types of thermostats they show, one of them is what you need. If not, go to http://www.americanwaterheater.com and ask for a replacement.
Oh yeah, water heater thermostats are not "plug in" and require that you know how to disconnect/reconnect some wires and replace a screw-in plumbing part in a matter that will prevent a leak. But the company referenced above offers full instructions.
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John McGaw
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John McGaw wrote:

John - I wonder if the OP knows what the cause of the failure is? I assumed that s/he was talking about the element, not the thermostat. I suppose it could be either but the element is the most likely cause. A simple check with a voltmeter / ohmeter will tell. In any case, most thermostats are external and don't require screwing in to any part of the water heater that could cause a leak. Did you mean to say element?
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Rowland wrote:

Just for fun how about this idea:
Fact #1 "it just stopped heating the water" Fact #2 "Where to get thermostat" Fact #3 ... missing
What is missing is the connection between the water heater not heating the water and the need for a new thermostat. While a thermostat may be a cause of the water heater failing, there are lots of others, including circuit breaker off, heating coils out etc.
If you have not already done it, you need to first determine if it is the thermostat or you are just wasting your time and money. I would not list a faulty thermostat as the most common problem.
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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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10 years seems to be pretty close to operatioal life of an average HW heater.
I'd check a plumbing supply company - not HD?lowes, etc. - they should have a HW rebuid kit which includes upper and lower thermostats and heating elements. Just make sure you have the correct wattage for the elements (you shuld be able to fine the info on the info tag on the tank itself). Spend the extra five bucks for the element wrench...it'll save you a substantial amount of aggrevation and cursing at the HW heater... :)
As for welding the copper pipe it is fairly easy. Sometines you can find beginners classes at a local home center. If not, a good DYI book on basic plumbing should have all that you need. Practice sweating joints with about $10-$15 of copper pipes and fittings. Afterwards, you should be pretty proficient doing your own soldering. Another possibility is using compresasion fittings. They are a bit more expensive than soldered fittings, but no soldering is involved. You need is a wrench or two, some joint compound, and a pipe cutter to cut out the original soldered fittings.
Cheers
Steve
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