what to put in a small toolbox for in the house

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I'm too lazy to run out to the workshop for tools for every tiny indoor job. Decided I'd make up a small house toolbox. I was figuring at a minimum:
several screwdrivers of varying sizes -- slotted and Phillips needle nose pliers -- also can be used as an adj. wrench in a pinch! pliers 2 crescent wrenches utility knife wire strippers bailing wire electrical tape picture hangers/nails/screws small hammer tape measure torpedo level
what else?
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Small strap wrench.
I user mine once or twice a week.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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Duct tape and WD40-- if it is supposed to move and doesn't--WD40. If it isn't supposed to move and does--duct tape. Seriously, you named most eveythng, possibly small hot glue gun and a few glue sticks, maybe a small file, some assorted sandpaper, and if you didn't mention it, an assortment of all fasteners--nails, brads, tacks, wood and sheet metal screws, nuts and bolts and possibly a staple gun if you ever use one. Larry
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lp13-30 wrote:

I'd stock penetrating oil rather than WD-40. WD-40 is a "water drying" agent.
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Yep. Penetrating lubricant is a lot better than WD-40. I used to rent a storage unit at an older storage facility, and the woman who ran the place only bought WD-40 to lube the doors with, so the metal roll-up doors were hard to roll up. I am a very strong 240 pound male, and they were even hard for me to roll up using that crappy WD-40. So I asked her a few times to buy penetrating lube, but she finally told me to stop bothering her. So I bought my own can of penetrating lubricant, and my door became a lot easier to open. Karma's a bitch, man. She tweaked a disc in her back, lifting the doors and was on disability for awhile. I tried to tell her. Also she didn't know how to lift properly; she wouldn't bend her knees, would just reach over and use her back. She was one of these "know it alls" who can't take suggestions.
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I've had good results with PB Blaster from Napa.
Oh, WD means "water displacement".
Glad your roll up door got easier to roll. Also glad the rock headed lady got her reward, too.
--

Christopher A. Young
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lp13-30 wrote:

WD40 is not a lubricant and is best left on the shelf in the store.
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grappletech wrote:

Small pair of pliers, side cutter, Nylon tie, watch makers small screw driver set, and cordless screw driver(saves time) and I have a Dremel tool set. Oh, assortment of plastic screw anchor for wall mounting. And wife uses it most herself.
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Secondhand power drill, or a crank drill, a japanese-style pull-saw with cross-cut on one side and rip on the other, an extension cord, at least two fairly large C clamps, and a flashlight.
I would swap the crescent wrenches for adjustables (maybe that's what you meant), and add a big pair of vice-grips (the wrong tool for every job!), and swap a 4-in-1 screwdriver for the set of varying sizes. Maybe adding a set of jewler-screwdrivers. For the pliers you want at least one long-handled channel-lock.
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On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 22:51:56 -0500, grappletech

Why not start with nothing, and everytime you run to the workshop, put the tool in your indoor toolbox when you're done.

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grappletech wrote:

vise-grips
Lena
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grappletech wrote:

Arrow T-50 STAPLE GUN. This stapler is truly a classic tool. I have tried the others but the Arrow is still the best and has stood the test of time. I find the 5/16" staples to be the most useful.
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I follow the advice of a previous poster. Buy the tool you need for a project and add it to the toolbox when you're finished.
That's why I have a small pneumatic hammer (& compressor) in mine, for those tough jobs where neither the 18" chain saw nor the Sawzall won't cut it.
And I'm sure we'll all agree, when you need a stump grinder (and companion chipper), nothing else will do.
By now you may have guessed, my toolbag also has a trailer hitch & wheels (BIG tires).
Now...for the large toolbox....
Aren't you glad you asked?

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I find I use my small diagonal cutters quite often -- enough to justify their being in my small house toolbox.
Jo Ann
grappletech wrote:

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Love the cordless screwdriver for small jobs, use it with quick change drill bits, assorted drive bits. Small hammer, spirit level, assorted screws, nails, fasteners.
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Actually, I find I use my putty knife and painter's tool quite often, too (usually for neither putty- nor painting-related chores, LOL!)
Jo Ann
grappletech wrote:

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wrote:

I love my painter's 5-N-1, but I call it the 100 -N- 1 tool.
Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 22:51:56 -0500, grappletech

pencils, markers. scissors, files, single edge blade scrapper, extra utility knife blades, flat bar, Allen wrenches, stud finder, small testers, mechanic's telescopic mirror...YAWN...
Why not walk through your home, making a list of things you would need in each room. Make one trip to the workshop and fill the box.
Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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grappletech wrote:

Since nobody else her but me is willing to admit they occasionally scrw up and suffer a self inflicted injury, how's about a few Band-Aids and a tube of Neosporin or similar anti-bacterial cream?
It avoids having to leave the job and go looking for where somebody stashed the family supply of them. <G>
Jeff
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Agreed with the Neosporin and band-aids in a small first-aid kit.
Most of our pictures are hung on embroidery needles rather than nails. When removed they make a smaller hole. Plastic box with a few packages of needles.
For picture-hanging: 24-48" level (use as a straightedge), yardstick or drywall square.
Monofilament fishing line - don't need much and it need not be more than about 10# test.
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