What To Look For In A Refrigerator?

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Hi,
We are about to replace our 28 year old Kenmore with a new refrigerator. An ice maker is a given. I've looked at similar looking refrigerators that range from $800 to $2500. I would assume the more expensive units are better built but otherwise don't have a clue what I am paying for.
Thanks, Gary
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Beer?
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I'm on my way to Steve's house . . . .
-Frank
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http://www.franksknives.com /
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Frank Warner wrote:

You beat me. You could have left just one beer?
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 00:29:43 +0100, against all advice, something

There's more. Look for it in the 'fridge.
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Some leftover pepperoni pizza would be nice too.
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I'd avoid anything electronic, or having a circuit board. That may be impossible to do, but I'd at leat try.
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Serviceable. Unlikely, but we can dream. I have an old GE monogram double door the has the compressor on a roll out shelf on top. Very serviceable, but it has needed little & it has to be an early '80s model. In its life time with us it has needed a defrost timer, and a pair of defrost sensors.
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Abby Brown wrote:

I don't know much about the high end ones other than they are expensive.
What I'd look for would start with the following.
a good Energy Star rating - your refrigerator will run a long time, and is an appliance that can actually save you noticeable money.
glass shelves throughout
split shelves that will give you a lot of flexibility in spacing.
Big door shelves that can handle 1/2 gal soda bottles, gal milk containers, etc.
An egg tray
Big veg drawers with separate controls.
A bin for butter and cheese.
Some smaller door bins for mustard and other condiments.
A snack drawer that is up front and convenient.
Big freezer - you say you want an ice maker, but that probably won't leave you room to freeze racks of ribs when you find them on sale. I have an occasional wish that I'd gone for the ice maker, but it goes away when I see baby backs on sale for $1.99/lb.
Quiet operation - I don't know how you learn this other than from online reports, etc. Some refrigerators, even very expensive ones, are noisy to the point of intrusion. Most aren't, not even basic boxes, and noise probably varies within a given model. I've heard loud ones, and wouldn't want one in my kitchen.
just my thoughts,
K
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We have a space problem so we had to pass on the double doors. Glass shelves are nice. Be sure and test the drawers to see how hard it is to take them out for cleaning. My last two refrigerators have been middle of the line Frigidaire's. I still have the old Frigidaire - the ice maker broke and it was too old to get a new one at a reasonable price - so we moved it to the garage and it is nice to have the extra freezer space. The only thing I don't like about the new one is that it so "deep" - stuff gets lost in the back of it.
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K wrote:

You put MUSTARD in the fridge?
You know you can maybe double the available space by NOT refrigerating some things. For example:
* Mustard * Ketchup * Pickles and relish * Margarine * Some salad dressings (i.e., oil & vinegar) * Peanut butter * Maple syrup * Nuts * Coffee * Flashlight batteries * The dead cat you haven't buried yet * Canned soft drinks (use a glass and ice) * Most uncut fruits and vegetables (except watermelon, of course) * Olive oil * Eggs if you plan on eating them in a week or two * Most cheeses
Anyway, check the container. Unless is SAYS "Refrigerate after opening" you needn't do so.
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Some say it and you still don't need to.
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HeyBub wrote:

dries out, gets a crust, seperates

gets nasty acidic tasting, turns dark and funny smelling

gets mushy, and the sugar overwhelms the taste.

turns into mush, tastes nasty, separates

agreed
tastes nasty, and if real PB, the oil separates

agreed, but it can become unpourable from crystallization, and you have to add a dash of h20 and nuke it.

some nuts go rancid at room temp if not in sealed containers

sealed containers only

no significant diff from home refrig, since they are not kept cool in supply chain

that is what the back fence line is for. recycle, etc.

not if you have soft water- the ice tastes nasty.

some yes, some no. I prefer my veggies crisp.

yes
no way in hell. my brother tried that on a road trip with boiled eggs, and I refused to touch them after first 36 hours. I hate dysentary with a passion. If in doubt, throw it out.

only if in factory pack or wax-dipped

if it is sold cold, I keep it cold. If it is sold warm and I eat it cold, I keep it cold. I also keep bread products in frig- they last longer before going green, and it is harder for the ants and mice to find them.

aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:
Some observations:

See below on ketchup

Possibly, after several years. Ever see a restaurant that put its ketchup in the cooler? In your case, you might be better off with small, sealed, packets of condiments.

Huh?
Some margarine turns mushy. The margarine manufacturers deliberately add liquifiers because they know people are going to cool the product.

True. But commercial PB IS real PM, it's just been homogenized. If you make your own, you'll have a separation problem. Same with mayonnaise.

Then don't eat that kind.

Huh? Do you mean only if in the original packaging should live outside the fridge? Or do you mean uncovered coffee should be kept cool?

Water-softener lines should NOT run to the ice-maker. Softened water is an ice-maker killer. De-ionized is okay.

Then slice them thinly and fry them.

So he and his family died a most horrible death and you got to live large on the inheritance. Or was there some other outcome for your brother and his family? Now if your brother ALSO threw out the eggs, I'd suspect a motive on his part other than merely sharing a tasty meal.

Cheese was around for about 50,000 years before refrigeration. On the other hand, all the first century Romans who ate unrefrigerated cheeses are now dead...

I've never had a burger served with a frozen meat patty. You may be on to something.

I, too, keep bread in the cooler. But that's because I buy giant quantities at once from Sam's Club. Maybe that's why I'm so anal about what to put in the fridge. For example, 55 gallons of jalapenos simply won't fit in the refrigerator, no matter how much packing I do.
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If tap water straight from the city taste bad, so will the ice cubes.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with using 'soft water" (magnesium removed) in an ice maker. How pray tell can removing minerals and inpurities harm an ice maker? Do you think they use crud for lubrication?
I live where the city water is nasty canal water and I use a line from the undersink RO purifier for ice. Works great. Neighbor has a whole house water softener as do two of my relatives. Obviously their ice makers work just fine. Do you have some confused notion that water softeners add salt to the water output? They don't. The salt is only used to recharge the purification rods/beads.
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wrote:

you can use an r/o supply for the icemaker, but you don't want to use metal tubing for delivery. the water will quickly pull metal ions out of the tubing causing leaks pretty quickly.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

I was wrong about soft-water / ice-maker. Soft water does make better ice and is easier on the ice-maker.
I'm not confused about salt, although many others are. People on a low-salt diet are really supposed to be on a low-SODIUM diet. Water softeners exchange Sodium ions for Magnesium (and other) ions, so people on a low or salt-free diet are really getting MORE Sodium than without using a softener.
Now the facts are these. Sodium or salt does not CAUSE hypertension, it merely aggravates the condition. About six percent of the population has hypertension and about half of those have the kind that doesn't take kindly to salt.
Bottom line: 97% of the population can use as much salt as they want with NO adverse health problems. Several studies have been done where test subjects ingested up to 25 GRAMS of salt per day for extended periods with no adverse effects. Anyone who's ever eaten in a military mess hall can verify this.
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clipped

Not so....sodium/salt causes fluid retention, which alone can cause hypertension and congestive heart failure. There are other causes for hypertension, but fluid retention would aggravate all forms, whatever the cause.

Folks who have even the risk factors for hypertension, without evident disease, should limit their salt. A stroke or heart attack can be the first "proof" of hypertension, and that can be too late.
My hubby was on meds for hypertension for about 10 years, which kept it very well controlled.....so well that he decided to quit his meds because he felt so good. I was away for a wedding, and when I returned, he wasn't feeling well. Next morning he was in distress. After being stabilized in hospital, the docs pumped a quart of fluid out of his chest cavity. An extra quart of "breathing room" makes a hell of a difference. His idiot decision led to discovery of 90% blockage of a coronary artery, just in time to prevent heart attack.
There have been steady and frightening increases in juvenile obesity and, with it, high blood cholesterol levels. These are very young people headed for heart disease and they should not be taking in the amounts of salt that you suggest are "ok"....kidney disease and diabetes follow, another reason to limit salt.
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HeyBub wrote:

Ignoring any questions about salts of whatever kind- soft-water ice tastes nasty, especially if it sits in the freezer awhile in a self-defrost unit. The actual h20 evaporates off, and the trace element load increases. I almost never use ice because it tastes so bad, and the cubes are usually half-evaporated. It leaves a nasty residue in bin and chute, and the chilled water tube is almost plugged. On the other hand, I <love> the in-door water and ice at my sister's place, with no softener. If I ever get around to getting a plumber in here to clean up the punch list of piddly projects, one of them will be replacing ice maker saddle tap in basement with a coupling, and running a new feed off a tee attached to an accessible unsoftened cold line near the feed from the well, with a shutoff valve to make the inline filter painless to change.
One of these days....
-- aem sends...
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 13:54:19 -0700, "Abby Brown"

I'd look for the thickness of the insulation, per year cost of energy, and as few features as possible. I like ice makers, but not through the door which wastes space. Check Consumers Reports, they have very good articles.
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