What is a good treatment for wooden shovel handles

Page 2 of 2  
On Sunday, March 11, 2012 8:39:05 PM UTC-4, (unknown) wrote:

My dad used linseed oil mixed with turpentine half and half. Ive used the same to treat window sills.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is my understanding that the FIRST coat is a 50-50 mix because the turpentine acts as a carrier and drags the BLO deep into the wood's porosity. After that cures, the coating can NEVER go deeper. So, that first coating make as deep as possible, else you'll have shallow film over the wood's surface, not complete encorporation into the wood itself. That was what I was told.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Mar 2012 10:54:08 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Won't argue with that. But I never cut it with turps, and weathered wood would be sucking up more the next day on the 3rd application. It's very slow to dry. You have to wipe off the excess and then rub the surface with rags to get rid of the oiliness. I'd paint it a few days after that. Oil paint. Fine for tool handles, and sealing up weathered wood. Not good for nicely grained furniture because it darkens up and the grain starts to disappear after a few years. BTDT.
--Vic
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 11, 8:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nohoo.com wrote:

That isn't necessary, IME. Just get a fire going and toss them on, mine burned just fine without any accelerants. -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, March 11, 2012 at 6:39:05 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@nohoo.com wrote:

Tung Oil
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

pretty worn, LOL. I still like wooden handle I don't like fiberglass one.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Simplest solution is linseed oil and a cotton glove (to spread it evenly everywhere on the handle once a year.) Ash makes the best handles, viz. strong and crack-resistant.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:52:01 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I treat mine with regular motor oil. Just buy some cheap oil and rub it on with a rag. Then let it sit in the sun for a day, and give it a second coat. After another day in the sun, wipe the handle with a dry rag to remove any excess, and you're ready to use the shovel.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I put motor oil on my axe handles.
Greg
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.