What does the water company charge you for?

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On Jan 24, 3:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

but couldn't you state that about EVERY project in the usa that received (receives) federal funds? are you advocating that there be no federal money paid for infrastructure in any state? how much of my taxes went into providing the interstate road system and water system of your state? could your city afford the cost of the infrastructure to provide water to you in total? we in arizona are paying for the trains in la and dc, along with the levees in la, the airports in every state, the highways in every state, etc.
furthermore, we are repaying federal loans that were used to build the canal from the colorado through our local taxes. and actually, the farmers from 40-50 years or more ago are the ones who actually paid for and built the canal system and the dams that formed a lot of the lakes around here. i would hope that they would have been paid off a long time ago.
frankly, you don't know about my individual situation. my local water provider has a well and storage tank in the property adjacent to my property. they provide water to about 200 houses in my general location. some of my neighbors have their own wells. so when you say 'you' receive federal funds, i assume you're speaking in generalities, because for sure there were no federal funds used to provide me with water.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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Of course. No doubt you're paying for part of the costs of water delivery in Indianapolis, too (though not mine specifically, because I'm on a private well).

Yes -- unless it's for a purpose authorized by the Constitution. Building dams in Arizona, and forcing the people of Hawaii, Indiana, Alabama, and Maine to pay them goes quite a bit beyond the legitimate authority of the Federal government.

Interestingly enough, that's one of the (few) purposes that *is* specifically authorized by the Constitution.

Probably not too much. Indiana isn't in the middle of a desert. We have plenty of water here, and we don't have to build extensive systems of canals, aqueducts, and underground storage reservoirs to get water for drinking. Here in the midwest, we don't build dams across rivers in order to have drinking water. We build them for flood control -- in short, because we have _too_much_ water, instead of not enough.

Probably yes -- but it wouldn't really matter if they couldn't, because it's pretty easy to sink a well and hit water in Indiana. Anybody who wishes can hire a well driller and provide his own water.

Yep, and so are we -- and we shouldn't be.

Again, *that* one is specifically authorized by the Constitution. You might stretch that point for rail and air as well, because the authorization for building roads is specifically for the purpose of carrying the mail.

So none of those dams were built with Federal *grants*? Yeah, right.

Yes, absolutely.

Nor me. Private well, as noted above.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

<snip>
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"Post roads", sure. I think you can make a pretty good case for the others with the "interstate commerce" clause.
--
Keith

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You're on. Go ahead and make that case. Listed among the enumerated powers of Congress, the clause says in full "To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;".
Now make the case for that clause authorizing Congress to take tax money from the citizens of Indiana, Maine, and Hawaii, and use it for building a water project in Arizona.
Make that case.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

?Others? == rail, air, and Eisenhower system (though that was justified under defense).

No intention to try.
--
Keith

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So... I guess there isn't "a pretty good case" for it after all, huh?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

Try reading what I wrote again, this time for comprehension. Slow down, if needed.
--
Keith
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If there's such a good case to make, then go ahead and make it. Or you can admit you were talking through your hat. Take your pick.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Or he could point out that, other than you, nobody has any trouble telling the difference between the words "highway", and "dam". But why bother? Just because a dog barks at you doesn't mean you have to bark back.
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snipped-for-privacy@mojaveg.lsan.mdsg-pacwest.com (Everett M. Greene) wrote:

What, you think that there wouldn't be any produce from California if the Federal government didn't subsidize it? Don't be ridiculous. If there's a market demand for it, somebody will step up to satisfy the demand. That's the way a free-market economy works.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

There are those who advocate eating a lot of veggies and fruit every day for good health. You can pay a lot for the produce in the off-season on the free market or you can buy the tax-subsidized products at a reasonable price. You can pay now or you can pay later. Your choice.
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That's kind of the point. The fountain helps cool the plaza, which would otherwise be even more of a giant stone solar oven. This is classical roman technology, here.

As long as it's a recirculating system, I don't see the problem.
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A simple non moving pool of water will lose a quarter inch per day in evaporation. Move it around like the one Doug showed and I'd be willing to bet that fountain is going through AT LEAST a hundred gallons a day in that area.
--
Steve Barker


"Goedjn" < snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu> wrote in message
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Doug Miller wrote:

As Will Rogers once said "I only know what I read in the paper".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acre-foot
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wrote:

That's not far of for water-district budgeting purposes... For instance:
"...Similarly, while Austin's average gallons per capita per day is 180, the dry year gallons per capita per day used for determining future demand is 221 (occurring in 1984). ..."
But that's total water use for everything, not household water use. Whats the design value for septic systems, 120 gallons/bedroom/day, or 60 gallons/person?
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wrote:

Thousand gallons? That is 66 gallons a day. Not unreasonable if there is only one or two of you and you don't water the grass
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wrote:

One unit equals 748 gallons. I believe I pay $3 per unit
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True, but your meter probably reads cubic feet. One cubic foot = 7.48 gallons, so, 100 cubic feet as read off the meter is one unit or 748 gallons.
Use care in reading your meter as there are different types. Some are dials, others have a single dial and numbers like an odometer, some read decimal points and others do not, some have a multiplier where the meter reading is X10 (mostly for industrial use). Sometimes even the water company meter readers don't get it right. I've had the problem of under billing on one meter, over billing on another, in the amounts of thousands of dollars.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net writes:

Here in the wonderful state of Massachusetts, we pay a whopping $13.80 per CCF (or almost 2 cents a gallon) for combined water & sewer despite the fact that water is plentiful and the stuff is treated and dumped in the nearby ocean.
I believe that water is cheaper in the Middle East...
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Terry wrote:

This thread is a hoot. I'm glad I live in a place where the water company has enough sense to say what the units of measurement are. If fact, I would bet that most bills define the units of measurement. In my case the units are CCF which is defined at 100 cubic feet or 748 gallons. 2 month usage is 11-12 CCF (1,100-1,200 cubic feet, you do the math for gallons) when not irrigating.
Course the real problem is that the customer charge (mainly billing) is as much as the actual water charge (deliver costs plus maintenance). I should be so lucky as to have a business that charges as much to bill a customer as it does to actually provide a service/product. In my region, only the domestic water and irrigation water companies do this. Apparently the electric company, the gas company, and the sewer and trash companies realize that billing (every month) costs less per year than billing 6 times a year (domestic water) or only once a year (irrigation).
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