What does code say about this

I can't get any help from the code office. They want a drawing but won't give me the info to do it right. Well, to be honest here's the complete story. Three years ago we erected a double wide for a cabin. I was informed that I needed a rudimentary porch on the front (we seldom use it) but that it wasn't high enough to require a railing. I believe that the thing is only 4'x4' and 28" high. I would like to make the deck wider (left to right, not front to back) since it's a bit dangerous getting in the door. I would like to cantilever a new set of joists from the 4x4 to the left and right and then, add a railing. How much can I cantilever these joists? Is there any other consideration? As always, TIA! Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not their job to do the design work for you; that's your job. You have to show them what you're going to do, how you're going to do it, and with what materials, and usually require a guestimate of the cost for tax purposes.
If you ask, I'll bet they'll even accept sketches as long as you have dimensions and the relevant data they need to make a decision. Unless you've already pissed them off, that is, in which case I'd make sure everything followed the books 100%.

Hard to say what you can "cantilever" without knowing a lot more about it. A sketch would help, in fact (sorry, couldn't resist!)<g>. If you actually even mean cantilevering, which I suspect you don't. If I were you I'd check with a couple contractors and see what they can give you; maybe invite one over for a 6-pack next Saturday or whatever, to talk it over. I don't have any handy right now, but there are quite a few sites that will let you calculate what you'll need for overhangs, extensions, weight bearing, etc., etc., and railing requirements, etc.. Do NOT go on what you "heard". Since this will affect your taxes from the sound of it (everything does these days), it means you're in for an inspection and that in turn means you need to design and build it to specs. x by x wood, spaced x apart, supported within ... by ... and fastenings of ..., and so forth. Truthfully, it doesn't sound like it would need much of a drawing. When I extended my front stoop and added a wheelchair ramp, the "inspection" consisted of drinking a beer while we debated whether it was technically "attached to the premises" or not. I lucked out; they decided it was a free standing, so no tax hit. The "inspection" in this case was one of the guys had to drive by my place to get to work, so he just watched me as he passed by in his pickup. The only real problem I had with calcs was being sure the roof snow-load was met, so I seriously overdesigned that part of it. It really pays to be palsy-walsy with those guys.
HTH
Twayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably not enough to do what you want to do.
The general rule is that a cantilevered joist which is full run and rated for the entire span can extend no more that 25% of its length. So with out getting out the calculator or the code books, if you sister the existing joists you can add a foot on each side.
And that assumes that the existing joists run from left to right and not out from the structure.
Now if you run out from the structure your only option is to build and addition to the left or right in the same manner you built the original structure. Might just be easier to rip it off and start over.
Good luck.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & E wrote:

I'd think you would be OK if you went 2' past the 4x4 and then supported the end of the joist with a 2x6 (or whatever looks right) going back down to the bottom of the 4x4.
Draw that up and see what they say.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bit tricky understanding the original post!
But if reading that correctly the existing 'platform' is presently 4 by 4 feet and about 28inches off the ground? It probably has at least four 'floor joists? Which are most likely at the very least two by six lumber of suitable grade. This assumes the existing is not something temporarily knocked up from a couple of ex-shipping pallets! And presumably not attached to trailer/s in any way????
It might be possible to sister and extend those joists out a bit further, 'maybe' another 15 to 18 inches and add supports angled back to whatever posts the thing is supported/built on. It is totally possible it is held up by those concrete blocks just laid on the ground ............... we really don't have enough info to go on!
With or without much clear info to go on; totally agree that it's not the code office job to design the job. It does sound as though any competent carpenter could sketch up a design in 20 minutes and see if the code office accepts or suggests changes.
This question is rather like going into a bookstore to buy an encyclopedia and then expecting the bookseller to tell you how to qualify for a literature degree!
Ergo; as in every business/trade you have to know what you are doing. And to not do so one could be risking injury to those close and/or also insurance liability.
In some countries they don't concern themselves about such things. As a result sub standard buildings (including schools) fall down, extra floors are added without inspection, safety features, even hand rails, are not provided, construction is performed without safety standards in mind and workers get killed on the job. etc. etc. So while a small but safe extension to a porch platform is a trivial job safety is important. Also having been in the past a little involved in municipal matters for some 10 years there is often concern when 'trailers' which tend to get 'add-ons' of odd sizes, shapes and various degrees of safety are involved.
We also lived in a 35 foot single width trailer for a while, back in the early 1960s. So while the odd garden shed detached from anything else may get a cursory look anything near or attached to any living unit is likely to get 'looked at'.
One other thought. There is presumably, for insurance coverage purposes, some form of light over/near that entrance platform and/or any steps up to its 28 inch above ground height?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.