Wet carbon steel knife forgotten on rice cooker

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It should be taken off the market for ordinary consumers. That concentration of HF (1.5-3.5%) is dangerous. If any is absorbed by the skin, it causes gangrene! Graham
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<...snipped...>

Whink makes several products with "Rust" as part of the name. Not all of them contain HF acid. The MSDS for their product named "Rust Stain Remover" and sold in a brown bottle, does clearly list "Hydrofluoric Acid (Hydrogen Fluoride)" as an ingredient and has all kinds of warning statements, including this line in the Emergency Overview section: "Will penetrate skin and attack underlying tissues and bone."
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Why not just leave it alone?
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Because HF shouldn't be part of ANY consumer product.
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The scouring powder Barkeeper's Friend has oxalic acid in it. I'd make a paste, apply it, and wait. Keep the paste moist if you can. For example, lay a moistened paper towel on top.
BF is not very abrasive, but I'd be careful about rubbing it on plastic, which is quite soft.
Cindy Hamilton
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

BF powder is 100% oxalic acid
http://www.barkeepersfriend.com/files/MSDS_BKF_Powder_2010.pdf
and is pretty abrasive. i use it to remove mineral deposits on the kitchen sprayer head.
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The MSDS indicates 5-10% by weight.

I generally use it to remove baked-on grease from cookware.
Cindy Hamiton
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wrote:

does the rust stain affect the operation of the rice cooker?
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Rust doesn't "soak in" to iron anymore than soup does. Whatever rust you see is on the surface. If you care about the appearance, get a knife not to use, as some people do with copper pans. Remove the rust with steel wool or (after wetting it with oil) with a razor-blade paint scraper. Then sharpen it. Cosmetic damage is the least that happens when a carbon steel knife is left wet. The first damage is to the edge. If you can't tell, it wasn't sharp to begin with.
Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
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On 5/26/2011 9:33 PM, Jerry Avins wrote:

Uh, you do know OP was talking about the stain on the rice cooker, right?
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No, I obviously didn't. "Soaking in" should have given me a clue.
Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
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