well tank/pump question

I've got a 7 year old Gould well pump and a 35 yr. old well tank that I was instructed (when I moved into the house) by the previous owner to drain and re-pressurize the bladder with air twice a year. I've done such, but this past time was the first time I've run into a problem. After inflating the bladder to 38 psi. (pump shuts off at 58 lbs.) and refilling the tank, I'm getting air coming through the pipes when the pump turns on and starts to pressurize to 58lbs. The air usually starts coming through about 15 seconds after the pump turns on. I suspect the bladder might be bad, only because when I first drained the tank, I wasn't getting any water coming out of the air valve by the tank. The second time I drained it (once I realized there was a problem) and I shut off the supply line to the tank and unscrewed the cap to the air valve, I had water coming out of the valve. I also have a whole house filter installed by the tank and it should be pointed out, everything was working fine before I drained the tank today. Any help would be most appreciated.
Tony
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We recently had work done to our well/pump system. Turned out our well pipe was so rusted that the water it was pumping up was just going through the holes!
Eventually the holes got so big that the pump ran constantly and we couldn't keep pressure in the system.
But looking at our bladders, the guy said much the same thing.....if the bladders were bad, we'd get water out the air pump nozzle when pumping (even when the bladder is good he said you'd still get SOME water as the bladder is semi-permeable) and the pressure in the system would drop fast with usage (as the pump would be the only thing keeping pressure in the system.)
I really don't know if this helps. Maybe try turning off your pump and seeing how long you have pressure in your system and then turn the pump on (with taps off) and see how fast it comes up to pressure.....

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Most if not all welll pump pressure tank bladders are made of Neoprene; they are not semi-premeable or otherwise porus in any way.
Gary Quality Water Associates www.qualitywaterassociates.com Bulletin Board www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2
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I am the great repeater....just repeating what the well guys told me!

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You should not get water or water vapor out of the Schrader air valve on a bladder type pressure tank. If you do, it means the bladder is broken or at least has a hole in it which it should not. That will allow the air to dissolve into the water and effectually disappear. That will cause 'short cycling' of the pump and cause excessive wear of the motor while increasing the electric bill.
Also, the correct way to set the air precharge pressure is to drain the tank and set the air pressure to 1-2 psi less than the cut-in (turn it on) pressure switch setting. Not the off setting, the on setting. All pumps are operated in a pressure range; 20/40, 30/50 or 40/60 etc. with 20 lbs (differential) between the on and off settings of the switch. This is done with no water in the tank. Shut off the water past the pressure tank and drain it. Leaving the drain valve open, turn on the pump for about 5 seconds and shut it off. Allow all the water to drain out and as it stops, you will get dirt out of the tank, Repeat as needed until no more dirt. Draining and flushing the tank and checking the air pressure should be done annually.
Gary Quality Water Associates www.qualitywaterassociates.com Bulletin Board www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2
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