Weldwood contact cement good to re-bond running shoe parts?

Anyone have any experience using Weldwood contact cement to re-adhere glued-together parts (thoroughly cleaned of course) of a running shoe such as the bottom sole layer to the spongy portion of the shoe bottom?
http://www.bizrate.com/paint_wallcoveringsupplies/oid857863869.html
Thanks
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James wrote:

I would think that contact cement does not cure and bond would be less than permanent like adhesive tape. I might try something like Gorilla Glue.
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Frank wrote:

Plyobond. It is a contact cement, but can be used by clamping and letting it cure. The directions say you can do this with a little heat. I've done it with and without heat.
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Take the project to a real shoe shop. For the few bucks you spend you're more like;y to be successful than if you experiment on your own. Remember, President Obama wants you to spread the wealth around and all the shoe makers I know are less than middle class. Good luck.
Joe
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wrote:

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wrote:

No experience with that product but I've used Shoo Goo to good effect: http://www.weplaysports.com/Shoe/Goo /
I think this link is to a retailer. The actual chemical formulation is found in a number of variants that I've seen at Home Depots under the Goop name, marine goop, kitchen goop, etc. I think Dick's Sporting Goods carries Shoo Goo.
This stuff is like *extreme* airplane glue and I always have some on hand for general glueing (other than woods). It'll replace a rivet on an old tool, it's that strong but I'm sure you know that once shoes start to pull apart, they're a little like Humpty Dumpty.
Good luck with it

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Any running shoe that is in the condition of needing parts glued back together is not a shoe that you should consider putting any more miles into unless you really want to injure yourself.
Most running shoes stop protecting a runner after 300/400 miles. Running more than 500 miles in a pair is dumb ... after that you start reaching the asking to see an orthopod.
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