weird painting occurrance


Was spot painting another area of my house yesterday... I'd taken down a big mirror (permanently mounted) over my fireplace and cleaned up the marks around it, patched the plaster around the boxes for the wall sconces, etc. I started by shaving down the brush marks with a razor blade and/or painter's scraper, then sanded with 80 grit, then 120 grit, patched some holes with patching plaster, went over everything again with 120, primed with Kilz 2, then finally finished with two coats of Benjamin Moore flat. (all paint was applied with a 3/8" nap roller, save for cutting in around the mantel, ceiling, and window trim.)
Here's the weirdness. I remember after painting, stepping back and noticing that there was a really noticeable spot at the upper left hand corner of where the mirror was where there was a lot of the texture of the old brush strokes from where the old paint had been cut in around the mirror. I distinctly remember mentioning this and making some comment about how I thought I'd done a better job prepping than that. Went back today to remount the sconces and now it's barely noticeable - if I hadn't known exactly what to look for and where I would never have seen anything. Basically, what you'd expect from a halfway decent prep job.
The only explanation I can think of for this is that the Kilz reacted somehow with either some patching plaster or the old paint and bubbled up, and then when everything dried it shrank back down to the wall. Sound plausible? Should I make a mental note to sand that area back down when I finally repaint the whole room, or not worth worrying about?
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Change in appearance of old brush strokes is probably just different lighting....might show more when there is cross lighting than when there is direct lighting. Didn't rush all those steps, I hope? Sounds like a lot to do in one day.
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wrote:

Could it have been a difference in drying time due to a cool area that slowed drying in the one spot? I have seen this more than once in 50 years of painting various owned homes in the winter time.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

No, it was definitely a change in the appearance of the wall... can't even feel it now. I actually did most of the prep/filling on Sunday and then the paint on Monday, so the patching plaster all set overnight.
nate
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Far cry from your situation but have seen this bubbling when painting with latex over a wall that had or still has wallpaper/wallpaper backing under the paint. Solution in that case is to prime with oil base.
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com:

yes, these were all latex products FWIW. Can you even get oil base primer anymore?
nate
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N8N wrote:

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Yeah, the regular Kilz, not Kilz 2, is oil based. It works much better for water stains. I have tried the Kilz Odorless and it was a disaster. Whatever it is made from dries very slowly and runs like crazy. I used a spray can in a small wall closet and got nothing but lace curtains.
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