WD-40 Question

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On 11/19/2010 2:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

thus, "BASICALLY" the same.
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Steve Barker
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2010 22:23:23 -0600, Steve Barker

Red paint and black paint are both basically paint.
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On 11/22/2010 7:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

True. And a good analogy. Different colors, but same basic ingredients.
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wrote:

Go back and reread the MSDS,and this time,look at the MSDS for each CAS number listed under WD-40. You will find that it's ~70% kerosene. Thus,it IS "basically kerosene".
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Jim Yanik
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On 11/19/2010 4:19 PM Jim Yanik spake thus:

Not true.
Yes, *one* of the ingrediments (listed twice in the MSDS for some reason) is kerosene, but it's nowhere near 70% of the total. The other petroleum components are naphtha (Stoddard solvent) and some unspecified "dewaxed paraffinic mineral oil".
Here, try it yourself: there's a MSDS search engine here:
http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/search
and the MSDS can be easily found through a Google search.
Here are the components given in that MSDS:
CAS 64742-47-8 CAS 64742-48-9 CAS 64742-88-7 CAS 64742-65-0 CAS 64742-47-8 (same as first)
(I left out the CO2)
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On 11/19/2010 5:00 PM David Nebenzahl spake thus:

Ackshooly, according to this page:
http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id#007001
WD-40 is 60-70% Stoddard solvent. Although I think that also contains some kerosene, judging from those other CAS #s.
Very confusing.
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2010 17:10:20 -0800, David Nebenzahl

CAS number can apply to more than one variant, as it does in this case.
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apologies if I'm wrong,but ISTR it was you that disagreed with me the last time about WD-40 being mostly kerosene. Thus your "deja vu".
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Jim Yanik
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On 11/19/2010 6:19 PM, Jim Yanik wrote:

thanks Jim. I don't write shit that is not true.
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Steve Barker
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All over again!
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When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Larry W wrote:

Reminds me of the last time.
Jon
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On 11/19/10 12:41 PM, Bob wrote:

It was made to displace water so wet things wouldn't corrode. It's about 50% stoddard solvent and 25% mineral oil. When the solvent evaporates, the oil remains.
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Not at all. ever see what happens to asphault when automatic trans fluid leaks on a driveway? That is the solvent action of a very good lubricant.
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Bob wrote:

WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement - 40th Attempt". Larsen was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion, by displacing the standing water that causes it. In the process, he arrived at a successful formula on his 40th attempt.[1] WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons.
The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture. This is diluted with a volatile hydrocarbon to give a low viscosity fluid which can be sprayed and thus get into crevices. The volatile hydrocarbon then evaporates, leaving the oil behind. A propellant (originally a low-molecular weight hydrocarbon, now carbon dioxide) provides gas pressure in the can to force the liquid through the spray nozzle, then itself diffuses away.
50%: Stoddard solvent (i.e., mineral spirits primarily hexane, somewhat similar to kerosene) 25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant; carbon dioxide is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability) 15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil) 10-%: Inert ingredients
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WD-40 is about the most worthless stuff I've ever seen. Doesn't lube well, doesn't penetrate well. No better solvent than Goop or Go-Jo. "Water Displacement" is a joke. I don't get how they sell the stuff. Can it be sniffed? Crescent wrench in a spray can.
--Vic
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On 11/19/2010 1:20 PM Vic Smith spake thus:

I disagree entirely with you here.
WD-40 is actually very good at its intended tasks. However, there are situations where it isn't appropriate to use it. I'm not going to enumerate them, as we've already had this discussion here about 40 zillion times.
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2010 14:19:07 -0800, David Nebenzahl

Too bad I missed that (-:
--Vic
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Yep.
It does what it is intended to do, jes fine. I had a distributor cap that was full of condensation, literally dripping water. No spark to any plug. I couldn't adequately dry it out by any means available to me at that time, but had a can of WD40 in my truck toolbox. I sprayed the cap interior liberally with WD40, it now dripping WD40, and put the cap back on. The engine fired right up, like nothing was ever wrong.
THAT is the sole purpose of WD40. All the rest is nonsense perpetrated by the same ppl that use duct tape and a screw driver for everything.
nb
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On 11/19/2010 6:06 PM, notbob wrote:

After an exceptionally cold night and a warm front with lots of humidity came through in the morning, my van just would not start. A spit and sputter here and there but not much more. Looking under the hood I see everything was just about dripping with water condensation. I sprayed WD-40 on the wires, cap, and coil and it started right up. Oh, and it's duct tape, a screwdriver, and drywall screws! ;-)
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What about a hammer to beat on things when the previous three items don't work?
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