WATER IN MY GASOLINE

I have water in my gas tank in my car, what can I do to get it out..please help with replies to sbgatl at aol . com
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Dump in some methyl alcohol.
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Just go to your local hardware store and buy a ver small bottle of methylhydrate and add one capful to the tank.

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wrote:

Drop your gas tank empty it and remove the fuel pump then dry out the bottom of the tank.
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Stephens Curiosity wrote:

Add something in which water is soluable. Acetone, for example.
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HeyBub wrote:

Well an old towel will absorb water. Perhaps you mean something that will co-solvate both water and gasoline and not damage any parts of the fuel system?
Note: It has been reported that acetone will damage some parts of some car's fuel systems and may not be the best choice.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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You hit the nail on the head!
Water in a gas tank naturally goes to the bottom of the tank. The BEST way of getting it out is to drain it from the bottom. Often the fuel intake in above a little "well" when water and crap accumulated. If one can get most of the water out of that "well" he can ignore the rest or add some alcohol as others suggest.
If there really isn't a well or you can't drain it, it might be worth the trouble to tilt the car back and to the side where the gas filler is. Run a "gas safe" plastic tube down and somehow apply suction. If will be obvious when you have water in the tube. If you pick up a reasonable abount of water in the tube just dump it in an open can and don't worry about "saving the gas."
I had to do this when I dumped ALL of the gas in a "portable" gas tank into the tank of my generator. Before I could stop I had dumped almost 1/2 cup of water into the generator tank. There was another CUP in the portable tank. I supply the suction with a $10 gadget from the auto parts store. The tube than came with it was long enough. Had it not been, I would have used the tube from a "gas transfer" kit I happen to have.
It's also true that cotton towells pick up the water and I have used that technique also.
Water in gas happens a lot when you store gas where there are frequent and large temperature changes. When it's hot, the tank vents and when it's cold the tank sucks in damp air. Condensed water ends up at the bottom of the container. The lessons are to NEVER attempt to use the last bit of gas and when the tank is "almost" empty dump it all out into an old coffee can and let the container dry out. This is best done on a HOT summer day.

The stuff you use to "preseve" gas will also take up a bit of water. But it's best to get as much by "mechnical" means as you can before getting into chemical warfare.

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look all vehcles fail eventually, theres probably a bad wire, module plug or other part that just happened to fail about the time you bought gas.........
vehicles today are high;ly complex I would take it to a mechanic for a opinion......
been there done all this wih vehicles a pro opinion can save a lot of time and effort
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No question about that.
But if you can get the "pro" to your car or your car to your "pro" you don't have to worry about anything.

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