Water In Crawl space during Home Inspection- Charlotte- NC


Bought a new home and before closing had it inspected. Well The biggest problem that came was Water in The crawl space. The builder has platic material all laid in the crawl space but on the corner of the house one could see atleast 6-7 inches of standing water . How will the water go away ?
Secondly the inspector took a 2 foot iron stick and could easily penentrate it in the ground. It was easy because the ground was so soft with water ? Was it surface water ..I am very doubtful ..can it be ground Water ..maybe ?
So with all the water there and watery conditions ..And due to lack of rain ..i am sure that when it rains it wil lbe a big problem as marshy conditions will create mold, etc in crawl space and then eventually bad air in the house
the inspector told me that French drains or sump pumps are good short term solution ?
I am reall ylooking for long term solution and since i have not done my closing on the house what can I say to the builder to have it fixed and then do the closing . What are really long term solutions that will work ?
Is there any kind of law in NC that houses cannot be sold with water in crawl space or something like that ?
Thsk in advacne for your help
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I'd run away. 6 or 7 inches of water is bad mojo. Maybe not for the house, but imagine all the snakes, mosquitos, rats, and other slimy vermin that would romp and play down in that crawlspace. Imagine what it would be like the next time a hurricane slammed through the area?
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Seconded. Not to mention mold.
That's a -serious- water problem, and would be expensive to fix. -----
- gpsman
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You need to have someone look at the problem. Is it underground water coming up? Don't buy the house in that case. But if it is poor grading that can be fixed. Call your town's building inspection department and tell them about the problem. I don't think the house can get a Certificate of Occupancy with that problem.
How to fix it. If you are near Raleigh, I used Regional Waterproofing once on a crawl space house and they did a good job. Over 10 years ago but they are still around. Call them up and see what they think. But if it is an underground stream, find another house.
Ideally you want an outside french drain that uses gravity and an inside french drain with a sump pump. I would call that a permanent solution if done correctly.
wrote:

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i would not want the seller to do the repair on this one. if you still want the house it has a substantial defect which may or may not be cured by money. in a form of a discounted price. the standing water would be a violation here in buffalo ny.
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How can i know if it is underground water or surface water. The home inspector took a 2 ft iron rod and penentrated in the ground with no problems as the ground was very soft . The front corner of the house had water in crawl space
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whats the grading around the home? top of hill or low spot in valley:(
If you have a decent downhill grade to install a french drain running to daylight, and not going to flood area your sending water you have a solution.
sup pumps require indfrastructure, to run during power failures, back up generators etc.
I would shop for a different home if the home is in a low area....
water can and does destroy homes.
snakes, mold, mildew, moisture and odors in home.
to say nothing of future resale value!
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see: http://www.buildingscience.com/bsc/resources/foundations/default.htm
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That's a good site to check as well as these: http://www.advancedenergy.org/buildings/knowledge_library/crawl_spaces / Besure to check over their NC Residential Building Code section -- that's very relevant to you -- as well as the technical reports. Obviously the home you're looking at is not up to code.
http://www.advancedenergy.org/buildings/knowledge_library/crawl_spaces/pdfs/Closed%20Crawl%20Spaces_Quick%20Reference.pdf
"> see:

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wrote:

Jay ..Thks for the info ..it is really eye openeing can companies like http://www.healthyenvironments.com/ verify for the problems in crawl space and whether they have used the right code or Not ?
I already had the building inspected by Home inpector but i guess they give a general idea and that is what i got ?
Who can confirm whether the building or crawl space is not upto code. Is it companies like healthyenvironments or Is there a city county office( Mecklenburg) or is the information only available to county once the closing has been done ?
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If I were you, I would not go to closing until the water problem is resolved. If you tell your mortgage company about this problem, or the closing attorney, the closing attorney by law, must hold the contractor responsible for resolving a problem like this.
Sanjiv, it is really important for you to answer the question about where your house is located. Is the ground around the ouside of your house higher and sloping away from the house? NC code says there must be 6" of slope for 10 feet away from the house so that rain water drains away from the house.
I have a hard time believing this is ground water, ie, water coming up from the ground. It hasn't rained here in Trenton, near New Bern but once in the last 3 or 4 weeks. Probably the same for you so the ground should be dry.
Check this: turn off all the water valves in your house and then go watch the water meter out at the curb or whereever it is. Does the water meter turn still? Measure with a watch, how many gallons over time? If your water line is running under the concrete footer or under your house and then up into the wall, the water line could be leaking. I had this problem with my new home but fortunately, the water leak was outside the crawl space wall.
I live in an area that is very low except the spot my house is on, which is about 2 feet above the surrounding low areas. It's about 80 feet from my crawl space to a low area in my back yard that stays damp and has standing water after a rain. My crawl space is dry as a bone.
If you can sink an iron rod 2 feet in the ground, there is a water line busted or your house is sitting in a low spot and the contractor did not build up the area like they should have. The inspector should not pass final inspection on your house if the soill is not sloping away from the house, the inspector is your last line of defense.
Please answer as to whether the house is in a low spot, was the soil built up before they started construction? I've seen this all too often in North Carolina. I have neighbors with manufactured homes sitting on flat land which holds a lot of water when it rains. The contractor did not slope dirt away from the house, of course they couldn't because they didn't bring in fill dirt and raise the area the house would be on, which is a must, and the inspector passed these homes. They don't have plastic on the ground in the crawl space either. When it rains real heavy for days, their crawl spaces are full of water. I can't believe how people get ripped off by shoddy contractors and inspectors that don't do their jobs.
Take a post hole digger or shovel out to your new house. Go outside the crawl space wall near the area on the inside that has standing water. Dig a hole 2 feet deep, is there water in the hole? How deep did you go before water appeared. Next go 10 feet away from the house and dig another hole, is there water in that hole too? If the hole 10 feet from the house has no water and the soil has sand in it, then chances are you don't have a groundwater problem because in sandy soil, the water level will be about the same everywhere you dig, within limits.
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The ground around the house is sloping away from the house on both the sides. In front it slopes more than the back . The house is approx 3 foot from ground.
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I am going to let the builder person know during the Walkthru ..but I am sure that they will come up n say that it will be fixed before or after closing and that house has 10 years of structural warranty . I will let the mortage company also know even though it is thru the builder. I have notified the Mecklenburg County Neighborhood Development Code Enforcement department and will call them tomorrow as what can be done I know once I am in the house i will be chasing the builder.
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Sanjiv, when you go to closing, you should be going to an attorney for closing. Let he attorney know that you agree to close but that you want a legally binding document that states that the contractor will remedy the water situation in your crawl space within a certain period of time.
I've thought about your problem some more, there is a possibility that when the plumber was installing pipes and checking things out that there was a leak in the crawl space until they fixed it. I had that happen in my crawl space. It takes a long time for the water to go away. If the plastic was already on the floor of the crawl space, and a water leak occurred, the water would run to the lowest spot. Does the plastick go up the side wall such that the water won't drain underneath into the ground very fast?
Your best bet is to also dig the hole yourself as I stated above. If you dig right outside the house where the water is on the inside and you don't hit water for 2 feet and the soil is not completely saturated, then I'll bet it was a plumbing leak that caused the water.
If your crawl space walls are cinder block, you have cinder block sitting on a concrete footer that is continuous around the perimeter of the house. This means that from the surface of the ground down at least 2 feet, water cannot get out of the crawl space by going sideways because the cinder block and the concrete footer stop it from happening.
Good luck.
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I am going there tomorrow with a Crawl space specialist and if he comes with issues then will not go for closing
The home inspector has stated in the report
FOUNDATIONS (Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.)     Repair or Replace
Visible signs of water intrusion in crawlspace along front of home are present from damp/muddy conditions, standing water at footings located (right of main entry), and from standing water at lower left corner. Water intrusion can lead to more costly repairs and increase damage if not corrected. Also, verify from builder the foundation drain extends to daylight. Recommend builder evaluate and provide the necessary corrective action (See Pictures)
As you said before the home inspector is last line of defense
I will be taking the purchase agreement to a Real estate lawyer to study in more details
Thks everybody for all the help
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