Water heaters

Page 3 of 5  
Yes, that's very possible. Shall we compare fuel bills some day? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Likely takes as much to heat your trailer as to heat my approx 1250 sq foot 2 story with finished basement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 04:19:55 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

the house and water and operates the BarBQ. Just put the BarBQ on NG last year, so if we have a good summer it might nudge it up to the $700 this year. A lot better than $30 to $45 in propane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 21:23:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Or my 3600 sq.ft. 1-1/2 story house with unfinished basement. ...but we live in different climates and have different fuel sources. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wow! Where is this? I just sold 60gal (with the house) for half that.

Just incredulous that electricity is (significantly) cheaper than propane.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in wrote:

during the year. Didn't know that. Had no choice anyway, the tank started to leak and new one had only 5% fill.

--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2013 3:44 PM, KenK wrote:

for a tank rental, you're stuck. i own my own 500 gallon tank, and call about 4 suppliers when it needs a refill. the price will vary a lot, sometimes by almost $2/gal from high to low. my last fill was about 2 months ago, for $2.49/gal.
amerigas runs sales about 2x/year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/13 11:46 AM, KenK wrote:

blanket. Those don't cost much. Would lowering the water heater temperature be an option? I have a natural gas on demand water heater. The darn things are spendy especially for mobile homes. I don't know if/when the payback will be. My motivation for buying one was it was something different. I live alone so only need hot water for a short time each day. There are some on Ebay if you're curious. There are some threads here discussing them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Run that as low as I can and still do dishes.

Hadn't considered that. I'm in same circumstance. Might be the best option.

Thanks. I'll look into that.
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I seriously doubt that a tankless water heater is going to be a good option. They cost considerably more. And the main savings is that they eliminate the standby losses that you have with a tank type, where hot water is sitting there all the time. And then you have the issue of a tankless gas or electric? Even to supply a mobile home, an electric one is going to have to pull a lot of amps. Maybe so much that the service can't support it without upgrading it. Same thing with a gas one. You need a supply line big enough to run it and that could require upgrading back to your tank. The one advantage you would have is your location, where the incoming water isn't real cold, so you could get away with a smaller BTU unit. If you start to look into tankless, those are the kinds of things you want to look at, not just the cost of the unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


The more information I receive from the friendly helpful people here the more I'm thinking I might well be better off staying with what I have - propane price be as it may.
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

i n stead of the 3/8" you likely have now.
And the reason Propane costs more than electricity is the handling and delivery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2013 7:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: .

What's the cost difference between propane and oil in Southern Ontario, any idea at all?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

past winter from Oct to Feb, and proipane is about 10% higher in Toronto area, 15% or more in Bracebridge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know how much or what you cook but for me it would take some humongously huge price difference for me to switch from a gas to an electric stove.
Have you ever spent any significant amount of time cooking on an electric range?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Never tried one. Thought they worked as well as gas. What's the problem with them? Haven't heard bad about them in cooking group but then again hadn't looked for such posts. There may have many I'd not noticed.
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

easier to keep clean - particularly if you go for a "smooth top".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 9, 7:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In general, I agree. A lot of this is personal preference and also based on whatever experience folks have had. IF your experience has been a real nice gas range and a cheap electric one, then you're opinions may be different. Gas does tend to heat faster. But then for making coffee, I use an electric kettle, which boils water faster than either a gas stove or electric. Gas is definitely more responsive. If a pan is getting too hot, it will react faster when you turn it down. With electric, it may burn. Another thing I hate about electric is that the older style burners would never stay truely level and oil in a pan would tend to run to one side or the other. But then the newer flat cooktops I guess solve that. Also, with electric the heat comes directly from the bottom and the sides tend to stay cooler. With gas and a larger flame, the sides of the pan can get so hot that stuff starts to burn on them or a spoon left laying in it gets heated and burns you.
In the end, it's what you're used to and what you prefer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To a certain extent. But then I would also look at how many commercial kitchens and professional chefs use electric ranges.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 9 Apr 2013 16:36:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

And you can tell by looking at the flame, how big the flame is and how hot the fire. Looking at the electric stove knob doesn't tell me much, but after 25 years, I knew some rules for some kinds of cooking. Then I had to get a different brand of electric range and the settings, Medium, Medium HIgh, etc. are not the same temps as what I had learned. Or if they are, maybe i learned by which absolute direction the knobs were pointing, not which setting they pointed to.

I have that trouble with an old GE. My even older Whirlpool used plug-in electric "burners" and they were always level.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A lot depends on how you cook, but my biggest issue is the response time. A gas burner is immediately hot when I want to be, immediately cold when I want it to be and immediately any temperature in between when I want it to be.
I don't have to take a pot off of a gas burner when I want the cooking to slow or stop. That's not an issue when you only have one or two pots on an electric stove, but as soon as you reach 3 or 4, you run out places - except for the counter - to move them to.
Electric burners stay hot - and dangerous - long after you remove the pot. I've seen many a burnt cutting board and towels because they were put on an open burner that was still hot.
Professional cooks use gas mainly because of the responsiveness. On the other hand, some feel that electric ovens are more even from a temperature perspective, so I have heard of cooks who have a gas stovetop and an electric oven.
I grew up with gas. When my parents sold the house they bought a double without gas and have been using (and hating) an electric stove for the past 10 or so years. Dad had to replace the oil fired boiler before this past winter, so he had the utility run gas from the street and bought a gas range, dryer and boiler - for both the front and back apartments. Big bucks but Mom is finally happy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.