Washing Machine Tray

My wife and I did some remodeling and created a new laundry room on the first floor. We decieded to have a washing machine tray (bought at Lowe's) put in.
The washer sits in the tray just fine; however, whenever we run the washer, we noticed water sitting in the tray afterwards. We had the washer checked out, and the repair man stated that water was coming up from the drain. Basically, when the washer empties the water, some of the water backs up into the tray from the drain. The plumber who put it in states that there is nothing he can do about it.
Supposedly he put in an offset 'y' connector, and the water should not be coming back up.
Is there an easy fix to this problem, or do we need to cut up the floor and have the plumbing re-done??
Any information would be helpful...
Curtis K. -------------------------------------
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On Jul 7, 11:04 am, ckuppler_at_ezeeweb_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (kupplerc) wrote:

Your plumber installed a possibly non-code compliant drain. If he is an unlicensed handyman and refuses to deal with it, bite the bullet and have it redone by someone with better trade skills. If he works for a plumbing firm, some pressure to do it correctly could be applied via your city building inspection department. The symptom you describe is typical of drain venting problems. Good luck.
Joe
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On 07 Jul 2008 16:04:56 GMT, ckuppler_at_ezeeweb_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (kupplerc) wrote:

Check for proper venting, pipe slope and pipe size. A drain should not back up. I'd ask another plumber.
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kupplerc wrote:

Hmm.
Obviously the washer is sending water to the drain faster than the drain can process it. Several possibilities for the symptom come to mind:
1. The drain pipe is too small. 2. The drain is clogged. 3. The vent stack is blocked. 4. The washer has one humongous pump.
If nothing else works, you could find some way of restricting the drain hose from the washer - clamp, crimp, valve... - to reduce the flow rate.
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When I did mine, I put a drain in the pan, which I made. Figured if I ever got it full of water it would be an easy way to get rid of water.
We send rockets out of this solar system. I think there is something a competent person "can do about it." You may want to make some phone calls. First to give the plumber the chance to fix it, next to the inspector or contractor's board of your state if he doesn't. If the man can't properly plumb up a drain for a washing machine, something's wrong.
Just my opinion.
Steve
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wrote:

WE do?
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http://www.matessa.org/~mike/voy_pio.html
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You need to get out more.
The Voyager 1 spacecraft is a 722-kilogram robotic space probe of the outer solar system and beyond, launched September 5, 1977, and currently operational. It visited Jupiter and Saturn and was the first probe to provide detailed images of the moons of these planets.
Voyager 1 is the farthest manmade object from Earth, traveling away from both the Earth and the Sun at a relatively faster speed than any other probe.[1] Though its sister-craft, Voyager 2, was launched one month earlier, Voyager 2 will never pass Voyager 1. Neither will the New Horizons mission to Pluto, despite being launched from Earth at a faster speed than both Voyager craft, since during its flight Voyager 1 benefited from a number of gravity assisted speed boosts.[2]
As of May 9, 2008, Voyager 1 is over 15.89 terameters (15.89×1012 meters, or 15.89×109 km, 106.26 AU, 14.72 light-hours, or 9.87 billion miles) from the Sun, and has thus entered the heliosheath, the termination shock region between the solar system and interstellar space, a vast area where the Sun's influence gives way to the other bodies in the galaxy. If Voyager 1 is still functioning when it finally passes the heliopause, scientists will get their first direct measurements of the conditions in the interstellar medium. At this distance, signals from Voyager 1 take more than fourteen hours to reach its control center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a joint project of NASA and Caltech in La Cañada, California. Voyager 1 is on a hyperbolic trajectory and has achieved escape velocity, meaning that its orbit will not return to the inner solar system. Along with Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 2, and New Horizons, Voyager 1 is an interstellar probe.
Voyager 1 had as its primary targets the planets Jupiter and Saturn and their associated moons and rings; its current mission is the detection of the heliopause and particle measurements of solar wind and the interstellar medium. Both Voyager probes have far outlasted their originally intended lifespan. Each is powered by three radioisotope thermoelectric generators, which are now expected to continue to generate enough power to let the probes keep communicating with Earth until at least the year 2025.
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I think he means that no one in this ng sends any rockets out of this universe. I personally have only sent rockets on to the roof of my house, into the street or into my neighbor's yard. All within our universe.
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Along that line, then, I believe that fixing a washing machine drain should not be an insurmountable problem. Especially when a licensed professional (was that the case) did the work and now has the story "It won't work"?
Oren, do you have anything to say relating to the problem? I'd be interested in hearing that from you.
Steve
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wrote:

Not a plumber, but I would determine if the the drain has the proper "pitch" @ 1/4 inch per foot.
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wrote:

I didnt think that in itself was sufficient. I presume the pan has a trap between it and the main sewer, but of course the trap is there to prevent sewer gas from coming into your house.
You're in a simlar position to having a sink and a shower next to each other. AIUI, sometimes a draining sink will back up into a shower, but it doesn't happen if the drain pipe below the junction is clear and the air vent up through the roof is clear.

I didn't notice this, but I guess Oren means that we only send satellites much beyond the earth.

But you need to hire the National Air and Drain Administration.

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the pan on mine drains to an open line outside the house. Plumber said it couldn't tie into main drain as the trap would dry out and allow sewer gas into house. Does everyone else's tie into the main drain?
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mike_0 snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

<SNIP>
You have it correct.
The pans are not approved as a "fixture" and are not intended to be connected to the sewer, with or without trap.
The pan can drain via an "indirect waste" into a sink below or even to a floor drain. The drain tube should have a gap between the sink or floor drain.
Or, as in your case, the tube can drain to "daylight", meaning outside.
Jim
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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 08:51:39 -0400, Speedy Jim

Well, that's not the way they did the OP's house. I don't know what I would do in his shoes.

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Is there a laundry tub, or just a drain pipe? If just a pipe, is it 2" or larger in diameter? 1 1/2" pipe is not big enough for a washer drain pipe unless there is a tub to absorb the extra, as I understand it.
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Is it possible that the pipe is partially clogged? Maybe you should try snaking it out to see if that helps.
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kupplerc had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Washing-Machine-Tray-317549-.htm : Thanks to all the replies and good information.
I will check everything out and see what can be done.
Curtis K. ------------------------------------- kupplerc wrote:

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