Walls leaking on slab


I have a house that a portion of it is built on a slab, I took the carpet off of the floor to tile this room. the carpet was wet along the wall line. Now with just bare slab water is forming and it is coming from the inside of the T-111, more in the corners. Coming down the wall then coming into the house. The roof does not leak and there is no man made item that could creat this problem, such as anything to do with water. No base boards, washer,waterpipes ect --------nothing not even under the slab. The house is insulated with 3 1/2" of insulation from the 60's, could it be that the insulation has flattened out ant is not working properly? The wall are 2/4 construction 16" center. It was just recently caulked and painted and was re shingled last year. Can anyboty help???????/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a house that a portion of it is built on a slab, I took the carpet off of the floor to tile this room. the carpet was wet along the wall line. Now with just bare slab water is forming and it is coming from the inside of the T-111, more in the corners. Coming down the wall then coming into the house. The roof does not leak and there is no man made item that could creat this problem, such as anything to do with water. No base boards, washer,waterpipes ect --------nothing not even under the slab. The house is insulated with 3 1/2" of insulation from the 60's, could it be that the insulation has flattened out ant is not working properly? The wall are 2/4 construction 16" center. It was just recently caulked and painted and was re shingled last year. Can anybody help???????/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Odds are, something ain't flashed right on the outside, and water is getting in up high and traveling down the back of the t1-11, then coming in under the sill plate. If the outside wall is tall, like a gable end, did they use Z-flashing between the panels, or just stack them? Is there a cap over the window holes?
And did you check the outside grade, to make sure water isn't ponding outside the wall? Is there a proper stub foundation wall, or is the sill plate right on a flat slab? If the sill is on a flat slab, it'll never be right. Best you can do in that case is add outside flashing and drainage at the sill level. I looked at a house like that when house shopping- actually had dirt outside the siding above the slab level. There should be at least 4-6 inches of exposed concrete at grade level below the bottom of the siding, at minimum. 8-12 inches is better.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is not a gable wall, it is the front and back wall, and they both have a two foot overhangs, that is totally sealed. the roof is new and there is no sign of moisture on the top plates, it starts below the top plate and is on the inside side of the tar paper, hitting the top of the bottom plate and then ging onto the slab.-----Weird huh? snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

What does the outside look like? Is any part of the slab near or below grade? Does water collect on any side of the structure?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The outside of the house is T-111, the slab is ubove grade, and there is no misture collecting on the outside Joseph Meehan wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote: the carpet was wet along the > wall line.
Now with just bare slab water is forming and it is coming

The roof does not leak and there is no man > made item that could creat this problem,

How did you decide the water was coming down the wall in the stud cavity? (Is there some piece of information you didn't include in your post?)
What is the source of the water? Do you think it is rain water?
Is there a joint in the plywood or a window that might be a place of entry for water?
Perhaps the recent painting and caulking has changed something to route water into the wall.
TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If any of the T1-11 is in contact with soil or below grade that's would be a problem area. Any water pudding up against the siding could cause a water problem. Rain with wind can cause the water to blow up the siding and over the edge and down the wall . I have had this happen two house One T1-11 the other Stucco. Easy fix Caulk ( paintable) were siding meets overhang. Another possibility is a roof problem that could be tuff to find. It can also be a window letting rain water in the wall. You can probably hit the siding with a hose start low work your way up. Try and hit one area Like corner trim then check for fresh water.You can cut a whole in the wall were water is on floor reach up inside if insulation is damp/wet it's coming down the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did remove the paneling off of the inside wall, this is some kind of condensation problem. This is not a leak problem --everything is sealed. Sacramento Dave wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the wall is insulated there should be no condensation. If the isolation is damp water is getting in the wall. . Did you say the roof was new? If you had no problems before and the Roof is new I would say the roof has something wrong. Our old house never had a problem for 12 years until some extreme rains and wind storms hit. It can be a roof flashing up high, water running down some way. Water can problems can be a real pain to find. Start eliminating things Hose the siding down low especially corner boards and joints, Then try the windows.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Only if you have something like an extractor fan venting into that wall space. It's a stretch to imagine that any vent could result in the amount of water you described.
I think it's more likely a leak. Bear in mind the source could be some distance away. It's suprising how far moisture will travel (even horizontally).
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did remove the paneling off of the inside wall, this is some kind of condensation problem. This is not a leak problem --everything is sealed. Sacramento Dave wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That was my next suggestion. Insulation alone will not stop condensation, in fact it causes it to happen. Water vapour from the room will travel through the paneling, through the insulation and condense on the inside of the cold exterior wall covering and drip down to form a puddle, just the same as it will on a window, and even faster on a window covered with heavy drapes. You need a vapour barrier under your paneling. Tarred paper on the insulation is useless. The standard now is 6 mil poly as a single sheet. If you cannot/don't want to remove the paneling, you may want to paint with a vapour barrier paint that is available.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.