wall paper paste?

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On 4/14/2015 11:15 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

As to the atachment, if it's fairly short term, you might get better results with Arrow staple tacker and T-50 staples. Quick and easy. You can get different lengths of staples.
If you are limited to screws, I suggest hex head pointy screws, like the ones heating and AC guys use. We used to call em Malco (brand) zip screws. They have a six sided head, and can be driven using a drill, and quarter inch hex tip. Don't buy the Stanley hex tips from HD, they round out promptly and are useless. Try to get good Malco. These pointy tip screws go in well, and the hex heads and drill tips give a good grip. Unlike slotted or phillips. You can get magnetic insert drill tips, which are excellent. I'll dig up a URL for you, if desired.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/14/15 6:21 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

The oilboard I've read about is a little thicker than a playing card. Is that what you're using?

have to slide it a little. The moisture in the paste may soften the paper. It may tear and wrinkle.
One person could hold the top edge of a paper strip in place while a second person uses cellophane tape, the kind with a nonreflective surface, to secure it at several spots along the top. Then you could paste the oilboard and press the paper down without having to position it.
Another approach would be to put rubber cement in a squeeze bottle. The cement comes in gallon cans, and the squeeze bottle would keep it from drying before use. Run a bead along the oilboard where the top of the paper will go, flatten the bead with a plastic spreader if necessary, and attach the top edge of the paper. Then paste.
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I sort of answered this in another post. It is 0.015" thick. A bit thicker than a playing card. And heavy, with the oil impregnated in it.

Okay. I was thinking paint brush, as a brush is what is attached to the caps of the cans of rubber cement. I get your point about it could dry out. With 264 of these to paste, it is going to take hours. Probably far more then we realize. With two rolling scaffolds, one would put up the oilboard and the next the sheets. I don't know the length of them.
The reason for the scaffolds is the plywood sheets start on top of Jersey barriers. The sidewalk is behind the construction fence, so we will be blocking off one lane of traffic and be doing this in the street.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 4/14/2015 11:27 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

Sounds like a tip from someone who has never used rubber cement.

Spray varnish or adhesive would probably be the best choice.

You gonna' be on CNN?
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Don Wiss wrote:

I have no idea what oilboard is but if it is anything like Masonite I'd be using a short nap roller, probaly 1/4 foam.
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dadiOH wrote:

OK, I now know what oilboard is. I would still be using a foam roller to apply paste to the wall.
The question now becomes, how much tack does the paste have? If the oilboard is just slapped up there and positioned, will it hold the position without sliding down? Will it conform - or need to conform - to the irregular surface of (presumably) sheathing grade ply? You might need to add some staples and you might need to squeegee it down a bit. A piece of 1x2 could do that.
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Foam roller. I hadn't thought of that,

The oilboard can't be pasted to the plywood. After 10 days all has to be removed, leaving no trace. Yes, it is low grade plywood. It has been painted regulation hunter green. And is only a month or two old.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 4/14/2015 6:21 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

What is oilboard? Familiar with art supplies but never heard of it. Consider watered-down Elmer's Glue or some other version of PVA. Here is a link to Dick Blick, which is the best low-price online art supply dealer: http://www.dickblick.com/adhesives/glues/#polyvinylacetatepvaadhesives
Given the size of the individual panels, I would use a foam roller with thinned glue....thinned Elmers/PVA will become tacky more quickly and dry faster than wallpaper paste. If the paper is delicate, like newsprint, the wetness of wallpaper paste might make it fall apart while trying to position the paper. If using larger rollers, the shortest nap would be the best, being careful to spread paste thinly. If there is plenty of help, old paint brushes or larger chip brushes would work, too.
If intent on using wheat paste, go to any paint/wallpaper/hardware store and see what they have....plain old wheat paste shouldn't be more than $4-5.
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Don Wiss wrote:

Further thinking results in THE PLAN...
1. roll white glue onto oil board and let dry
2. fasten oil board to fence
3. spritz oil board with water (think garden sprayer)
4. squeegee paper sheets to oil board.
- OR -
Squeegee paper sheets to oil board before oilboard is fastened to fence.
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If we didn't have 2200 sq feet, or if we had a warehouse to setup in, this could be a good idea.

I though of this. Problem is the sheets are 20" wide and the oilboard 24" wide.
To remove we are planning to use a razor knife to cut the oilboard at every sheet break. Then we can save all the sheets. Yes, that will leave score marks in the plywood. But it shouldn't be too noticeable. And as noted before, the sidewalk is behind the construction fence and on top of Jersey barriers, so people wan't be getting too close. At least on the avenue. We have so many linear feet this will also be on the side streets. And we have to jump over every sign and opening.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote:

So what's the problem? Excess glue on the oilboard wouldn't hurt anything.
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On 4/15/15 9:27 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

I've never put oilboard on a fence, but I have temporarily secured roofing felt. Some use staples or nails. I like bricks.
All I need to do is secure strategic spots on the edges to keep wind from getting under it and lifting it. Rubber cement would be dandy if it would stick to roofing felt. Just a few dabs.
Rubber cement sounds dandy for securing oilboard to painted plywood. Just a few dabs along the edges and slap it up. Remove it undamaged with a spatula.
I checked the hazards of Elmer's Wrinkle Free Rubber cement. It contains a little isopropyl alcohol and a lot of heptane. It's flammable. Breathing a lot can cause drowsiness and nausea, but it's temporary. It shouldn't be a problem outdoors.
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What are Jersey barriers????
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On Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:03:05 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jersey_barrier
They are under the plywood construction fence, as the fence is right at the edge of a traffic lane. We will have to block off one lane of traffic to place the rolling scaffolds. The site manager will be present, and presumably some workers get the scaffolds to the site.
Across the avenue construction is further along. Scaffolds will probbaly come from there. The fence we were given surrounds a hole. Which they are probably still digging.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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