Wall Framing Question: Double Studs?

I know walls are normally framed using double studs down the sides of windows and doors. But what about small bathroom windows, with a finished opening of only say 24" tall by 36" wide? Would there also be a double stud on each side of it?
The reason I'm asking is that I want to install a stainless steel grab bar a foot or two below the bathroom window. I'd like to know where ALL the studs are in that wall are, so I will know what my grab bar length options are. I'm having problems locating the studs because the wall has had several coats of oil-base enamel applied since it was built in 1959, and neither my plain-jane two-buck stud finder that uses a magnet and trip pole nor my fancy battery powered Craftsman audio stud finder will tell me where the drywall nails are. The plain one won't indicate anything even when I'm directly over the outline of a nail, and the fancy one buzzes anytime I move it withing a half inch of the wall ANYWHERE. These walls have 16" centers, but that's not much help under a window because of the cripple studs.
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Anything is possible, but typically all windows would have a trimmer stud and a king stud. Surefire way to find 'em is to start probing with a nail. . Also, you can tap with your knuckle and with practice, hear when you are tapping on a stud.
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1959 construction may vary greatly by area of the country.
Use straight pins for your probe. They leave a very small hole. The T style is safer for your fingers.
Colbyt
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snipped-for-privacy@fastmail.fm wrote:

Standard would be two studs each side and then below the window a jack stud attached to them supporting the sill. There should be an additional jack somewhere in the 3' area so no space is more than 16". The layout of the studs if don right starts from one corner and puts a stud every 16" on center maintining that through any door/window spaces. Of course the spacing may, and probably does, start from the corner of the -house-.
You can locate the studs by using a very small drill and doing a series of holes. Once located the holes can be filled with nothing but a coat of paint or a quick dab of caulk or even toothpaste.
Harry K
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Hi, I remembered reading an article about an amazing anchor that worked well for this type of situation. I started googling and finally found it http://www.grabbarsonline.com/Installation/anchoring_devices.asp the article I remember reading mentioned a guy at a trade show hanging from a porch swing thatused these to hang the swing from a sheetrock ceiling. The author was blown away had he not seen it he wouldn't have believed it. I had forgotten about that until you mentioned this. I want to try them out some time, now you've got me curious.
Here are a couple of other links that my google search found. http://www.wingits.com/index.html http://estore.websitepros.com/1188279/Search.bok?category=WingIts+Fastening+System http://www.rd.com/content/openContent.do?contentId 089 http://www.adaptiveaccess.com/solidmount.php
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That looks great.

http://estore.websitepros.com/1188279/Search.bok?category=WingIts+Fastening+System
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On 21 Feb 2006 18:38:54 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@fastmail.fm wrote:

Have your wife do it. Most women can always find a stud.
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24x36 is still a window, why would it not have double stud? I mean, it's not THAT small.
And are you sure you are using the battery powered stud finder correctly? Read the directions. With mine, you put it on the wall _first_, then turn it on, then slide it from side to side. And it has nothing to do with nails either -- it measures the drywall depth using, well, something akin to sonar I imagine, like the old knock and listen trick -- and has no problem locating the wood stud directly through many layers of paint and whatever, nails or no nails. Only problem is when the wall is bumpy.
-k
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Couple more thoughts. I had one of the early Zircon stud sensors (late '80's, early 90's I think) It had a sensitivity wheel instead of auto calibration. This last year I got a new Zircon stud sensor, not the cheapest, not the very best, but a pretty good one. I think the price was pretty reasonable. It definitely works a lot better than the old one. The technology has improved a lot.
However, even though I do have that stud sensor. The way I normally find studs is with a really strong magnet. I have several old disc drive magnets and they are light but very powerful. It's easy to give yourself a blood blister if you play with them and they slam together. They are very strong but pretty small. I basically just gently rub them along the wall or ceiling surface, holding them lightly. When they get over a nail, they stick there as my hand continues sweeping. I do that on a few nails along a stud or rafter and it is obvious where the thing is. I did it on Monday at a friend's house that has one of those magnetic child cabinet locks and they tried it with that and it would stick to nails too. She loved it and started doing it all over her walls. Find a strong small magnet and try it out!
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