Very slippery marble floor


I have a very slippery marble floor which is dangerous to walk on. I nearly slipped several times and my wife actually did slip and fall.
Is there any easy method to make this surface have more friction without damaging the appearance or the surface itself?
Thanks for any suggestions.
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no. put down rubber backed rugs, or abrade the surface.
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I was hoping somebody could possibly recommend a non-slip topping which could be mopped or sponged onto the surface. I would have to think that some such product has been developed, given all the slips and falls people take on ceramic tile, marble, and other slippery / smooth floor surfaces. Maybe something used around swimming pools or other public areas is available?
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usually you don't put shiny marble floors on something that people normally walk on when they're wet. in those places that do, have some sort of rubberized mats, roughened surfaces (either painted on with sand or other grit added), or textured surfaces (tile).
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Smarty wrote:

tile is slippery. if you want stickery, put down carpet.
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Smarty wrote:

They do. It's made of epoxy and sand.
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These folks seem to offer a lot of options ( http://noskidding.com/ ) and this product also offers safe use on marble supposedly ( http://www.trusty-step.com/1001.php ) but not sure if either is really any good or if there are better choices available???
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FWIW, polyurethanes are inherently high friction. A water based PU varnish might give you the result you want. It will be light colored, so the stone may not change appearance very much. Try a small section somewhat out of view to see whether the improved friction works for you.
Joe
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wrote:

FWIW, polyurethanes are inherently high friction. A water based PU varnish might give you the result you want. It will be light colored, so the stone may not change appearance very much. Try a small section somewhat out of view to see whether the improved friction works for you.
Joe
--
really? sliding over polyurethaned hardwood floors in socks comes to mind.



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I would be worried about adhesion on this as well.
Friction comes from the surface being more irregular. It's pretty difficult to have a glossy finish and non-slip at the same time. Some rubber backed rugs are probably the best solution. Is this in a bathroom?
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Smarty wrote:

There might be a finish (sealer) that makes the floor too slippery. If possible, contact the installer or prior owner for info. If that isn't a solution, there may be a sealer which makes it less slippery. It would help to have more info - extremely slippery when floor is dry? You are wearing shoes or just stockings? It sounds very dangerous, and the solution may be in covering or replacing it. Can the floor be repolished to a less glossy finish?
We have terrazzo in our kitchen, which I love. Only problem is that if there is a wet spot, even from dropping a little piece of ice, the melt will make it extremely slippery.
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Thank to all for the replies. I am dealing with a dry floor made of marble tiles (12 inch by 12 inch) which is extremely slippery in stockings, somewhat slippery in leather-soled shoes, and not really dangerous if rubber soles or bare -feet are involved. It is in a residential foyer / entrance which is a heavily-trafficked path from one end of a home to another, and does, on occasional, also get wet, making the problem even worse. Fortunately the wet surface only occurs when outside visitors bring rain or melted snow into the foyer on their shoes or boots, which is something quite easy to control with carpet, mats, and other methods at the exterior entry door.
There are many products sold commercially and on the Internet which promise high friction / high traction non-skid surfaces, some of which have their own issues when used on marble.
I am mostly looking for anybody who has some experience with this type of approach, since adding carpet runners, non-skid tape, gritty patches, and all the things which may be considered in a public bathing area, for example, would look entirely inappropriate in this entry foyer.
Sorry I was not more specific to begin with, and thanks again for any suggestions.
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"Smarty" wrote

I have no direct experience with this but i recall some floors in Florida done that way Mostly they were entry foyers.
What people did was use a 'coating' (not sure if it was an epoxy or what) and in it they mixed a little fine grain sand. This provided a still somewhat shiny look, yet had sand in there to help traction.
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You should invite several people over for dinner. Have them remove their shoes, and have your video cam ready. You may have a $10,000 AFV winner.
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On Tue 22 Sep 2009 05:35:22a, Smarty told us...

There are numerous products on the market, some waxes, some other type coatings. Some may be more appropriate for marble.
Google for non-slip or anti-slip wax, or other variations. You'll get plenty of hits, and I'm sure you'll find one appropriate for marble.
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wrote:

Rubber mat, the kind made from recycled tires. I use one on a concrete bathroom floor, easy to clean and tough.
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On Tue 22 Sep 2009 06:39:17p, Phisherman told us...

Functional, perhaps, but hardly esthetic on a polished marble floor. If one must cover part of it, I would suggest an oriental rug or runner laid over a slip proof padding.
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The non-slip products I have seen work by slightly etching the floor and are acids. Marble can be damaged by acids so be very careful if you choose to use such a product. If your floor is highly polished there may be slight dulling but that is preferable to falling. I would not apply polyurethane as you will have a heck of a time removing it when it eventually wears or scratches.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Very-slippery-marble-floor-396027-.htm pspman222 wrote:
Slipdoctors has some solutions which will work great. Aerosol products or mop on products. Depending on traction level or appearance change there are many solutions they offer. Call them. Http://www.slipdoctors.com
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