Very Distant TV stations and Antennas

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040801 2134 - James Nipper posted:

Yes, I had this in mind, and with a rotor, and the right terrain, what the OP wanted could be quite obtainable, and maybe even more.
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xx_capriceclassic snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (a.t.) wrote:

140 Miles over flat terrain is pretty much beyond your reach, even with a very tall tower, what with curvature of the earth, and all. Adding mountains and foliage to the mix I'd say it's pretty much impossible, barring springtime/autumn temperature inversions or rare E or F skip. Time to call DirectTV.
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Chuck Reti
Detroit MI
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I see this as a question without enough information. Particularly the UHF/VHF information. I used to live near Harrodsburg, KY, and set up an antenna to recieve "Doctor Who" from the PBS station in Cincinnatti, Ohio. It was a UHF station. We were over three times the fringe area distance. In fact, during a pledge drive, they knew the number we were calling from, and tested us by asking how many fingers they were holding up. I did it by removing the LNA from a 10 foot satellite dish, putting a UHF bow tie antenna in its place, with its own coax, and aimed it at the horizon. I did similar stuff for VHF with (true)screen doors serving as the reflector for a multielement antenna pointed at the doors, which I had mounted at a right angle to each other, 45 degrees from grade.

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reflector
LOL! Does my heart good to see that the backyard tinkerer McGyver gene has not died out in this country.
Wish I had a place in the boonies where I could do stuff like that without the neighbors having kittens.
Keep on tinkering, sir!
aem sends....
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Personally, I thing you need to either go ahead and connect to cable, or start learning about antennas, particularly rhombics if you have plenty of space.

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I'm not an expert on digital TV but aren't the TV stations supposed to end analog broadcasting in 2006? You might consider this before you invest alot of money in towers, amplifiers, and antennas. I live in the far northwest suburbs of Chicago and if the stations ever dropped analog broadcasting I'd be up a creek. I cannot receive the digital signals reliably even though the analog signals come in snow free.
I would post this question at the AVS forum: http://www.avsforum.com . Ask in the HDTV reception area (even though it's not HDTV). They are very good at getting reception from weak signals

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I bet they still have NTSC in 2106 or at least 10 years after the last NTSC TV is sold.
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Ask your local dealer.
Depends on signal quality, antenna hiegth, etc., etc...
Buy a quality antenna like Winegard, and add the recommend pre-amp kit that the local dealer suggest. The two part pre-amps work the best. They come in all sorts of amplification ranges. (some will amp both U/V, some will do one and not the other, Winegard AP series)
~kjpro~
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I agree with the previous advice as to not investing a lot of money until you figure out how you're going to transition to digital, which is under a FCC mandate to happen in the next few years. I would think this date will get pushed out, but you should at least factor in the transition to digital. In your case, it may offer some compelling advantages, as digital doesn't have issues with snow, ghosting, etc.
I'd find where the digital transmitters are located for your area. A good place to start is www.antennaweb.org
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A.T.:
A > I was wondering if it would be possible to get an antenna that would A > pick up a network station in a town about 140 miles from the A > transmitter. This is also in a mountainous area of Virginia. The rest A > of the channels would be arriving from a town about 50 miles to the A > north. I am trying to set up an antenna to get the networks and not A > have to get cable. Would it even be remotely possible to recieve such A > a signal? Thanks in advnace.
Maybe, maybe not. You will need a high-gain antenna pointed in the direction of the transmitter site. Note: the transmitter site is not necessarily "anywhere near" the studios. Locally KWQC-TV/Channel 6 has studios in Davenport, IA, with the transmitter at the antenna farm here in Bettendorf, IA, about 10 miles away. OTOH KLJB-TV/Ch 17 also has their studios in Davenport but their transmitter is in Orion, IL (yes, different state), about 25 miles away. The FCC website has this type of infornation.
You might want to look into a Beverage Antenna, which is primarily for Ham use but has been adapted for other bands. Good news it is rather cheap to build and is very sensitive. Bad news is mountains or other tall structures between you and the transmitter are going to block the signal no matter what kind of antenna you use.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Keep Using My Name in Vain And I'll Make Rush Hour Longer - God
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RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
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Seems to me that VHF signals are line-of-sight. That being the case, if there is a mountain in the way, my guess is nothing will help. Not sure about UHF signals. If there is no mountain, etc, then an antenna on a rotor and a amplifer might help, although I think 140 miles is really pushing it.
Jim
On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 15:35:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@rime.org (barry martin) wrote:

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Jim Laumann wrote:

Hi, Radio signal LOS is not equal to visual LOS. It's longer. Mountain in the middle? You can still catch stray, scattered signal by experiment. The higher antenna is the better is not a rule of thumb. Some times you have to aim antenna at wrong direction. Tony, VE6CGX
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