Using the old "White" 12-2 Romex

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On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 02:16:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

That is not exactly true. 90c conductors have been required in newly manufactured NM cable since 1987. (AKA NM-b)
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On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 12:07:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Available since 1987, required since 1991 IIRC
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On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 13:17:15 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Article 336.26 (NM cable construction specifications/conductors) in the 1987 code says "Conductors shall be rated at 90c."
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On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 13:39:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

While there is no date on the wiring that I have, I know it's newer than 1987. It was probably made in the 90's. Just before they made it yellow.
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On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 15:29:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Does it say Type NM-b? ("b" being the important distinction) NM-b was released in 1984 and quickly replaced the old NM from most manufacturers It was hard to find any NM that wasn't NM-b in the mid 80s.
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On 07/22/2012 02:24 PM, RBM wrote:

If it matters to the OP, "NM-B" is 90C rated, "NM" is 60C rated. The change to NM-B happened before the change to the standardized color coding for the jackets.
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I am looking to put a four foot baseboard heater in a bedroom . In the past I could use a 12-2 with a ground. Is that still up to code using 220 power and if it is what breaker should I use?
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On Wednesday, April 9, 2014 7:09:31 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

st I could use a 12-2 with a ground. Is that still up to code using 220 po wer and if it is what breaker should I use?
Depends on the amperage of the baseboard heater and the distance from the b reaker panel. In all probability a four foot baseboard section will work o k on 12/2 with a ganged 20 amp breaker. But you should still check the hea ter's power requirements on the box.
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On Wed, 9 Apr 2014 16:09:31 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If the heater is OK on a 20a circuit (1920w or less) 12-2 is fine. Reidentify the white wire to black (or some other color besides green). The white vs yellow vs orange jacket thing is more a marketing gimmick than a code requirement but it does make it easier for inspectors to figure out what wire size it is without looking at the jacket . on a heater 240.4(D) rules, 20a breaker on a 12 ga wire.
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12 guage - 20 amp 14 guage - 15 amp But 220 watts? I think you'll find there are two hot connectors, to be used with 12-3.
|I am looking to put a four foot baseboard heater in a bedroom . In the past I could use a 12-2 with a ground. Is that still up to code using 220 power and if it is what breaker should I use?
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On Thu, 10 Apr 2014 08:42:22 -0400, "Mayayana"

If this is just a line to line load (220v AKA 240v) why would you need to bring a neutral to it? (12-3)
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| If this is just a line to line load (220v AKA 240v) why would you need | to bring a neutral to it? (12-3)
I don't think I've ever hooked up baseboard heat. I'm just assuming US, 220 volts is going to need two hot wires and one white. Maybe I'm wrong.
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On Thu, 10 Apr 2014 18:34:19 -0400, "Mayayana"

If there is no 120v load, you do not need the white wire. You can reidentify it some other color (tape, paint etc) and use it as a hot.

200.7(C)(1)     If part of a cable assembly and where the insulation is permanently reidentified to indicate its use as an ungrounded conductor, by painting or other effective means at its termination, and at each location where the conductor is visible and accessible. Identification shall encircle the insulation and shall be a color other than white, gray, or green.
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On Saturday, July 21, 2012 12:49:23 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Type NM-B cable first began to be manufactured with color-coded jackets in 2001 to aid in identification of the conductor size. The color code that wa s introduced, which continues to be used today is as follows:
14 AWG - White 12 AWG - Yellow 10 AWG - Orange 8 AWG - Black 6 AWG - Black
This color coding system was developed to aid those who sell, install, and inspect Type NM-B cable so that the cable size can easily be identified, to reduce mistakes resulting from the use of an incorrect conductor size.
It should be noted that this color coding system is not a requirement of NF PA 70, National Electrical Code(R) (NEC(R)) or UL 719, Safety Standard for Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable. Type NM-B can be produced and sold without usin g this color code. As such, the print legend, which is required by the NEC( R), should be used to verify the conductor size.
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