Using Splicers and Tap Connectors with Aluminum Wiring instead of Twist On Wire Nuts?

I've been researching how to make my aluminum wired house safer without actually rewiring it. I've posted several question before to do with other ideas, however, I recently stumbled accross these products:
http://ebusiness.ilsco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId=1&categoryId!0
and
http://ebusiness.ilsco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId=1&categoryId7
These are splicers designed for aluminum to copper connections and tap connectors, which I'm assuming are bascially a splicer but made for more than two wires. They come insulated which I've never seen before.
I've read previous recommendations about split bolt connectors and splicers. These seem to be the connector choice for larger aluminum wiring and has never really caused problems on those larger wires. Basically I'm trying to stay away from using any twist on wire nuts on any connection that has an aluminum wire in it ...
I'm wondering if anyone has ever done this sort of things or if there's any information to back up my idea, etc.
Thanks, Harry
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http://ebusiness.ilsco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId=1&categoryId!0
http://ebusiness.ilsco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId=1&categoryId7
Those are good, for bullet proofing you can use an anti oxidizing grease over the wire, and inside the fittings...a thin coat, not globbed on.
In marine environment it would be dicier. Id think twice and use a real tight rubber tape wrap over the splice...then a tight electrical tape wrap over that.
the other aspect is the current running through the splice...say for instance you have a splice of #12 awg (typical for 20 amp circuits, but should not be constant amperage over 15 amps approx).... but your splice is passing 20 amps constantly... that is a problem..it will run warm or even hot depending on how much other wire is in the splice box, location and other factors.
that splice is going to be a lot more difficult to make work. (its also illegal, but it happens)
The bigger your wire is in relation to its rated load, the more relable the entire system is going to be, particularly at the splices you are mentioning.
Phil Scott

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These things are pretty big for household wiring. You will need to use larger junction boxes for your splices such as a 6" x 6" x 4" or an 8" x 8" x 4".
What is wrong with using twist-on wire connectors?
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The ones I'd use aren't too large, about 1.5 inches cubed for the tap connectors and I'm hoping the dimensions for the splicer is listed in cm or otherwise those things are way way bigger than I expected.
As for the twist on wire nuts, have a read here:
http://www.inspect-ny.com/aluminum.htm
Apparently they don't really improve the safety aspect of aluminum wiring much. About half way down the page you'll find lots of info about the Ideal 65 connectors that are approved for aluminum wiring. They do offer a solution for using a different wire nut which I might go with ... but I'm still debeating.
Thanks, Harry
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I would do a little more research Harry. That site was created by a home inspector. My experience with home inspectors leaves me with little confidence in their qualifications. They seem to read articles and publications and use the short sighted information for their own advantage. I read on this particular site about lightning protection. His recommendation is that you only use a Master Label certified contractor by UL Laboratories to install lightning protection. The last time I checked there were only 99 Master Label Certified companies in the United States and some of them were only manufacturers and not installers.
Something to consider when making a copper to aluminum connection is the load. Aluminum expands and contracts more than copper depending on how warm it gets. That movement is what causes the terminations and splices to become loose and consequently generate more heat which leads to greater expansion and contraction and even more heat. Since aluminum has a lower melting point than copper, the aluminum connection may eventually melt. Instead of trying to redo each and every connection, it might be in your long term best interest to gradually add new circuits to relieve or replace the existing loads on the aluminum wiring. Some rooms such as the kitchen usually have greater loads than a bedroom. It all depends on your usage. If you have an outlet that you plug an air conditioner or an electric heater in, then I would say that is a good candidate for an upgrade. You might want to start by mapping your circuits.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv
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Harry Muscle wrote:

Scanning the catalog, other dimensions that were identifiable (labeled or fractional) were inches. Another problem - wire is all marked STR, which I presume is stranded. If true they are not listed for and may or may not work properly for solid.
bud-
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I am not convinced there is any "safe" way to fix this problem short of replacing the offending wire.
Keep in mind that the problem wire is not the aluminum wire that is commonly used today in larger sizes, but the small gauge wire once used to wire up branch circuits in homes.
i think you realistically have two choices - one is to bite the bullet and replace the wiring. The other is to leave it alone. As an amateur you are likely to makke the situation worse rather than better.
Bud-- wrote:

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When you first posted this idea a couple of months ago. I believe you or someone else was looking for the tool for the connectors in Canada and found that you had to be certified to get a hold of the tool.
Out of curiosity I did some snooping in the local market and found one of the tools and the price of the connectors was outrageous. I googled for a time and came to the conclusion that few if any manufactures really want anything to do with the need or the market segment.
I came to the conclusion that it was not worth any more of my time and I would continue to do it the way I have for years, (with wirenuts) and "forget about it".
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