Using A Not-Correct Sparkplug in Snowblower ?

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Hello,
Can't get snowblower going, and think it needs a new sparkplug, perhaps.
Thought I had a replacement spark plug for snowblower, but apperently do not.
Have a new one for the Lawnmower, though.
Any danger in trying it in the snowblower ? What "might" happen" ?
Might piston at top dead center hit it, or... ?
Thanks, Bob
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 10:12:22 AM UTC-5, Bob wrote:

That potential problem can be avoided by making sure the replacement isn't longer than the original. As long as it's not and it otherwise fits, I'd use it.
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trader_4 wrote:

Hi, Another thing to consider is plug heat range. If it is too hot or too cold, engine may not run well. Always you can choose regular one or hotter or colder one with same plug model. For temporary replacement if it fits and not too long, I'd use it until correct one is available.
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 4:21:22 PM UTC-6, Tony Hwang wrote:

Wake up Tony...that's what they were just talking about! Snowblower and Lawnmower spackplugs are virtually the same. I bought a snowblower that a kid put a car plug in...broke the camshaft and bent the valve. It's still working 22 yrs later.
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 4:29:54 PM UTC-6, bob_villa wrote:

I must be from New England, 'Spackplugs'!
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bob_villa wrote:

Hi, After fix , you mean. My snow thrower, weed sacker, lawn mower don't share sae size plugs.
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 7:33:03 PM UTC-6, Tony Hwang wrote:

The weed sacker probably uses something a bit different!
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On 1/27/2015 10:11 AM, Bob wrote:

If the mower one is longer, perhaps might impact. Some times a wire brush will clean a spark plug. Quick spray of ether or carb cleaner will help rinse out the carbon fouling. I've also used a stiff wire to scrape em out. I use a give away key ring bent straight with pliers.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:17:59 -0500, Stormin Mormon

A friend who lives in NYC was forced to sell his Cadillac, for lack of a place to park I think, and he gave me a spark plug cleaner.
You may have seen an add for these.
AC-powered, and filled with little glass pellets, it blows the glass against the end of the plug and cleans them up nicely. Takes a minute or two per plug. Some of the glass bits tend to stay between the insulator and the shell but come out when tapped.
But with the hot sparks on cars these day, I never clean my plugs and even if I had a gas garden tools, I'd need a bigger shop to keep this thing availalbe. So I've only used it twice. (He included extra pellets but haven't used them yet.)

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On 1/28/2015 12:15 AM, micky wrote:

I remember them. Long ago in another life, I used to take the plugs out at 5000 miles, clean them and replace them at 10,000. Now they easily last 100k. Heck, the last 5 cars I traded with original plugs, battery, exhaust system.
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My 19 year old p[ickup with almost 3330,000km on it has had the plugs changed - not sure about the battery - it's still an OEM battery but may have been replaced before I got it. Valve covers have never been off, original exhaust and rear brakes even.
When I started in the trade brakes seldom lasted more than 3 years of easy driving, exhausts lasted a year or two at best and plugs were an annual tune up item at best. If you made 100,000 miles without at least one major overhaul you were doing VERY well.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: the last 5 cars I traded with original plugs, battery,

I am still driving my 1968 Chevy K10 suburban 4WD, no power brakes or steering, manual 4 speed. Runs good, had a 307 I believe but I had a 350 put in about 20 years ago--I have about 150,000 miles on it but may have to retire it as I need a steering gear for it and they are hard to find. I use it in the winter or as my fishing transportation in the summer.
JAS
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 8:06:21 PM UTC-6, JAS wrote:

...and this has something to do with spark plugs or the heat-range there of?
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bob_villa wrote:

Sorry
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wrote:

I used to clean a lot of plugs with the Champion plug cleaner decades ago - back when all engines were made of Cast Iron - and so were Chevy pistons. The engines back then could survive the odd grain of sand or glass bead going through - and seldom made 100,000 miles regardless. Todays aluminum engines? I wouldn't THINK of using a sandblasted plug. Particularly on today's plugs. Too much chance of stray beads staying in the plug, coming out in the engine, and doing damage.
Wax the plug cleaner up and set it beside your restored tire inflator in your "Man Cave" as a conversation piece.
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trader_4 wrote:

And possibly burn up the engine if the plug is not the correct heat range .
To the OP - clean that old plug up with a wire brush , open the gap just enough to file the tip of the electrode flat (points file works swell) and regap it . That should get you by until you can get a new plug - which you should do as soon as you can - BUY TWO and put the extra where you can find it . I have small plastic boxes (useta hold wet wipes at a nursing home) that are dedicated to one type of machinery's small parts . One for the chainsaws/weedeater , one for the tractor , one for electronic components (voltage regs/resistors/caps) and another for OA tips/flux/etc . Butter tubs work too ... yogurt cups , cottage cheese , any number of small plastic containers from pill bottles to ice cream gallon tubs , they're all over the house if you look .
--
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On 01/27/2015 10:31 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Good advice and one can estimate the heat range by simply comparing the two
http://www.globaldenso.com/en/products/aftermarket/plug/basic_knowledge/heatrange/
If the new one looks the same and is gapped the same it should /probably/ be all right.
However if the plug in there is not too bad though I'd clean and re-use.
Possibly: The snow blower might just need to be primed
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A very clear, well-illustrated page. I knew most of this stuff, but it helps to see it written so clearly.
This is what it says if you use a plug that's too hot: "When the center electrode reaches 950°C or higher, pre-ignition (early ignition) occurs, meaning that the electrode serves as a heat source and ignition occurs without a spark. Therefore, output falls and this can reach the level of electrode wear and insulator damage."
Only mentions damage to the sparkplug, not the engine. The page is from a spark plug company and they should know. I've never heard of Denso Spark Plugs, so does that mean it's a faux page meant to trick us into damaging our enignes?

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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 12:03:02 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

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Denso is a major Japanese parts supplier, both to OEMS and aftermarket.
While they don't talk about engine damage, pre-ignition could damage an engine itself, eg the pistons. There is also the issue of the operating environment, ie is this a high performance, high compression auto engine accelerating in a 110F desert or a lower compression snowblower engine running at constant RPM when it's 20F ambient? IMO, the risk of using a similar looking sparkplug that fits, for an hour to clear snow is minimal. To further reduce any risk, the OP could use the substitute plug to see if he can get it running. Once running, put the original back in and see if it too works. Probably not the plug anyway.
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wrote:

The big problem is pre-ignition can easily progress to detonation and burn a piston. Not as likely on a snowblower in the winter as on a dust-stuffed lawn mower in the summer - but not impossible,

Denso - that's short for NipponDenso - which is a very large Japanese auto-electric company and one of 2 OEM manufacturers for Toyota spark plugs. Not sure about present, but at least at one time in the past NipponDenso was majority owned by Toyota. Toyota's second source for plugs was NGK. I do tend to see more NGK than NipponDenso in the North American built Toyotas.

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