Using #14 wire for one light on 20A breaker

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Klipstein) wrote:

Yes, you did -- and I have repeatedly pointed out that this is not correct, that the Code absolutely does recognize increased ampacity with increasing conductor temperature.
The entire Code is online here: http://nfpa-acs-01.gvpi.net:8080/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7005SB
I refer you to Table 310.16.

You're commenting in a vacuum, based on a lack of knowledge. Read the Code. You're wrong.

Read the Code. You're wrong. Table 310.16.

Read the Code. You're wrong. Table 310.16.

Read the Code. You're wrong. Table 310.16.

No -- but that's because the Code builds the "80% rule" into the overcurrent protection limits for 10, 14, and 12ga conductors, not because of any limits on the conductor's ability to carry current. It's for additional safety. But if you would actually READ THE CODE, you'd find out that the ampacities are in fact considerably higher than the permitted overcurrent protection. It's two separate issues.

Read the Code. You're wrong. Table 310.16.

No, it's NOT starting to sound like what you're saying. You said that, according to Code, conductor ampacity "does not increase at all" with increased conductor temperature rating, and that simply is not true. Not for fixture wires. Not for appliance cords. Not for permanently installed wiring. Not true at all.
READ THE CODE.
Table 310.16.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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part:

OK, I learned something here - the issue that I was thinking of, where 15 amps is the limit for AWG 14 permanently installed wiring regardless of its temperature rating, is called "permitted overcurrent protection".
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Why not avoid any potential problems and just buy a 15 amp breaker for a few bucks?
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Abe wrote:

. Exactly:
Had one situation where we realzed that a circuit extended out to shed from a 20 amp circuit included some #14AWG.
We quickly changed out the 20 amp breaker to 15 amp not because of any problems but a) to meet code b) Demonstrate for an in impending insurance inspection (the first in the 36 years since house was built!) that wiring was built and maintained to standard.
Reminds me got one cracked duplex at the bench must change it. And although its indoors think I'll make the first one on that run a GFI.
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On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 09:12:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This is a do-it-yourself NG. What are you doing here?
John

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