use of a vacuum by painting contractor

Page 2 of 2  

rank beginner wrote:

First its near impossible to remove by sanding ALL lead based paint, it not only absorbs in the wood but is in nooks and cranies that cant be easily reached.
the environmental laws are there to protect EVERYONE and lead is a major hazard to kids. I have a friend with a mentally impaired daughter, slow would be a old time description. nice gal special ed. lead was implicated in her troubles but they will never know for sure.
as far as I am concerned its better to live by the law than put yourself or thers at risk and I hope anyone who breaks the law gets heavily fined or goes to jail.
a local contractor was caught not following the rules when painting bridges and water towers, he put so many at risk and is currently serving his 15 year well deserved sentence in prison, he also lost his family to divorce his business and all his money, once he is out of prison he will be paying 50% of whatever salary he manages to earn till he dies of old age...
he made extra $ by falsifying the reports.
all you need is some heavy duty fines and all contractors will follow the rules.
thats better than having adults with a mental abilty of 6 years old thanks to lead in the environment.
if someone did sand all the paint off your home years ago the lead is likely still in the soil, at home reasle time this may devalue your home, or leave you at risk for a large lawsuit from a future owner, since you are now aware of the risk and dont tell them..........
correct.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to Norminn, Pat, & everyone who responded for your helpful replies.
I don't think we need to test our house (single-family, built in early 60s), because I contacted the previous owner last night after my neighbor's comment and asked him about past paintings of the house before we bought. He said that since 1978 (the year lead in paint was banned under federal law) the house had been painted about 5 times, and at least once he could recall it was completely sanded down. Which means there would remain very little lead-based paint left on the surface of the wood -- if indeed there was any ever at all....And I also agree that local ordinances can be just ridiculous.....I mean if you're not going to strictly enforce them, why bother? ...a lot of it strikes me as politicking, local posturing by city councils pressured by homeowners hysterical about one thing or another.....What I wish they'd do something about is the constant pesticide-spraying that almost all of my neighbors like to do, just for the sake of the lawn. Oh, but to the upscales, the green lawn is a sacred item of americana...politically untouchable....well, we have a very young child, a toddler and we'd like to have more one day, and you better believe it I am concerned about those trucks coming by and spraying all those pesticides and herbicides....why can't they pass an ordinance requiring advance notice to all neighbors when the trucks are going to come by and spray?? I'd make sure the kids are inside. To me, this is 100x worse than small amounts of butyl acrylate (latex resin) and colorant particulates getting airborne.
I'm not sure I would not use a contractor just because he didn't use a vacuum as part of his painting service, especially if the contractor is otherwise really good. That's the case with this one, he is without question an excellent painter himself and his crew is great. They are attentive to our questions and really goes out of his way to inform us of the progress of the painting. We have been delighted so far with how things are turning out. They just started the main body of the house today, after finishing the trim & mouldings yesterday. It's really starting to look good. I haven't seen hare nor hide of our neighbor so far today....
I'll check my town codes to see what exactly the ordinance says regarding this, but I don't really feel like it now :) I feel like, here we are starting off the lovely Fall with a new paint job on our recently-moved-in house, improving our property and the neighborhood, and then we can't even have fun with it and the joy is lessened because of what the next-door brought up......Ahhh, suburbia..
Chris
Pat wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rank beginner wrote:

For houses without lead-based paint, who cares?
For houses WITH lbp, it's a real and valid concern. So the first question is, does you house have lbp? If not, you should assume it does.
For lbp, there are various levels of work. Your contractor should be using "safe work practices" as you are are seeking lead "control", NOT abatement.
An important part of lead control is stabilization. You need a good surface for your new paint. If there is lead, sand is a no-no. You can scrape it, you can remove it (but not with heat), you can remove the wood, or you can wet-sand it. Regular sanding is bad.
At the end, you should seek "clearance" of the house. On Federally funded projects, clearance is a requirement. Basically, the contractor should clean up all remnants of lead, including particle on the ground. They typically use a HEPA vacuum for this, but there are other ways, too. But if the house has lead paint, you should check your drip-line to see if the ground is already contaminated. If so, you have options but you need to deal with that lead, too. Planting bushed is an option, as is removal of the soil.
As for the town's ordinance, who knows. It would be understandable to enforce lbp requirements on houses with lbp or who's status is not know. For houses known to be lead free (from testing or age), it wouldn't make much sense -- but who ever said laws make sense.
My suggestion is that you test the paint to figure out what's going on. Even a do-it-yourself test kit from the hardware store is better than not knowing. Test ALL layers, not just the top -- you can use a knife to cut through them to the base wood.
Finally, a suggestions for you to make to your painter. Tell him that there are lots of lead-training courses out there. Most are 1-day but a supervisor's course is longer (3 days?). Most are free. If he takes it and then uses the safe work practices, he can market that as just another service of a great painting contractor. Upscale people love it because it gives them a warm, cozy.
Good luck. Let us know what the testing shows.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does not matter what I think, Only thing I do think is that your neighbor should mind his own business. Sounds like he may be jealous of your new paint job. Some people are just like that.
Go crack open a beer and admire your new paint job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ask your painter!!! I would be quite confident that your painter knows the laws. He may have already tested for lead. It is a very simple "wipe and look" type process available at any good paint store. If there is lead based paint, there are procedures to follow. I don't know all the procedures required for painters, but using a negative air machine is one for asbestos work. They just did a water tower here a few years ago and had to completely shroud the thing till it was blasted and sealed.
The cautions, codes, and laws are there to prevent contaminating other people or properties whether air born or ground contamination from drainage water. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rank beginner wrote:

You came here upset by your neighbors comments looking for approval on your contractor choice and job. you wanted a rose colored glass everything is fine response.
you know someone may turn in your home which could bring about a costly clean up. heck yopu may be stuck paying the costs of soil removal around your home. all trucked to a hazardous waste landfill.
yeah costs for jobs to meet codes can result in higer contractor fees....
the day will come where when selling a home requires a lead test of soil near home. your home may fail, thus being a hazard to kids, cutting the final home price.
just like a old or leaking oil tank, bad gas line, bad roof etc cuts the house price or makes it impossible to sell.
go ahead and enjoy your rose colored glasses but be aware someday this may come back to bite you..............
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, he came to get some gratification, but instead, has you running the Doomsday Machine. Have you seen the dust and analyzed it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

just making him aware of the risks, and just for the record I quit treating my lawn years ago, it has weeds but the birds bunnies and wildlife can play safely on my lawn.
want to bet this contractor was the cheapest? may even be his brother in law doing a side job.......
old owner wouldnt admit lead paint and really should of disclosed it at time of sale.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.