Update on wood floor over concrete base

Here was my original post of a few days ago: ------------- I need to lay a plywood sub-floor (ready for engineered hardwood to go on top) over a concrete floor in my first floor family room. What is the best way to fix it to concrete? I have never done anything like this before, but I understand there are nails that will drive themselves down into concrete....is that right? Are they easy to use?
Would this method be better than some kind of thinset/mortar etc? -------------- UPDATE Some kind souls on the group gave me some ideas about nailing/gluing plywood onto concrete or using sleepers. Well, I went to Menards today and they showed me some purpose made 2' square boards cut with tongue and groove, with a plastic base. The base has small feet which keep the wood approx 1/8 off the concrete.
This seems to be the perfect solution. Easy to install (it just sits on top apparently, though I might glue a small number on to give it some added rigidity) with tongue and groove and no glue required, plus the base gives you protection from damp.
Anyone else tried this? I am pleased so far (taken me an hour to do around 1/3 of a 12x18 room). It is more expensive than plywood, but, according to my back-of-a-napkin calculations in-store, only about 20% more. And I got it all in the Jeep!
Mat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're referring to DriCore panels. I just put in about 500 sqft worth of them in my poured-concrete basement a few months ago and laid some cheapie laminate flooring over it. I'm quite happy with them (floor's a lot warmer), and for us with our chronically seepy basement (which I'm sure will become chronically seepy again someday oneday in the future despite some waterproofing measures, they were pretty much the *only* solution that provided the best protection against future mold and rot. Plus, they'll let any seepage run straight to the floor drains; laying studs to nail plywood to would just trap any seep water, and the studs would eventually mold and rot as well. Might take 20 years to happen to PT studs, of course, but it'd still happen.
I've still got another 500 sqft to cover in the second phase of the basement renovation, and I'll be using them there, too.
AJS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.