Unsticking a corner carousel

With luck, I'll be moving in a few weeks. The new house passed the structural inspection with only minor issues noted but one thing I'm sure is going to make me crazy is that the kitchen cabinets include a corner carousel which turns with difficulty. I've never had one of these in my house and I'm not sure how to fix it. I've Googled newsgroups and the web in general and not found even an exploded view of how they usually go together. What can I clean and/or lubricate to make it work better?
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Christopher Nelson wrote:

Depends on what the problem is -- if the shelves are rubbing on the outer edge or somesuch, would take fixing that. If the bearings are bad or dry, lubricating them would probably help. Some of the units I've seen, however, are so cheaply made the real solution may be to simply trash it and replace it with a better unit.
--


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on 10/30/2007 9:27 AM Christopher Nelson said the following:

To take it off for inspection and lube, and if it is like mine with the folding corner door and a notched tray, look for a metal cap about 1-1/4" diameter on the tray just behind the notch. Pop the cap out with a screwdriver. Put your finger in the hole and slowly turn the tray. You should feel the screw heads (4) for removing the tray.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 13:27:31 -0000, Christopher Nelson

Personally, I'd remove it. Things fall off of it, wasted space, and it may not always turn easily. I saw (on TOH) an alternative to a carousel which has a quarter-round rack that swings out on the door and at the same time pulls a square shelf from the corner. I question the price of such a shelf mechanism, and maybe better off to store seasonal or seldom used items in the far back corner. Hmmm, now where did I store that deep turkey iron roasting pan?
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If it was like the one I had, the trays were friction fit to a central spindle and over time they would slowly drift down on the shaft until they hit the bottom and cause a great deal of friction. THe fix was to push them back up and drive a nail in to the wooden shaft to prevent the diffting down
wrote:

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jmagerl wrote:
> If it was like the one I had, the trays were friction fit to a central > spindle and over time they would slowly drift down on the shaft until they > hit the bottom and cause a great deal of friction. THe fix was to push them > back up and drive a nail in to the wooden shaft to prevent the diffting down > >
I think Phisherman had the real fix. Take the thing out and pitch it.
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"Christopher Nelson" wrote in message .

Normally if it isnt a paint problem and you are sure it's the spindle, then you have to oil at the base. The base may be hard to get at. In mine, it requires I pull the 'baseboard' of the cabinet off, then there are 4 screws we undo and the whole thing (including the outer cabinet which is attached) can be pulled out. We just did this 2 weeks ago (part of the fixes from renters who had our house). Underneath, was all sorts of spilled 'gunk' which had leached into where the spindle connected. Cleaned it all up and used WD-40, and all is well. If anything, it spins too easy now. The only hard part was getting the baseboard off in one piece (essential as it's not standard stuff but designed to match the rest and cant be found now).
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