under mounted kitchen sink Sealer ?

what should normally/usually be used to seal this counter-top & sink ?
[it appears the previous owner may have done a hasty job]
http://i.imgur.com/0r6PpeI.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/uY4FLHb.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/0UJcHAj.jpg
thanks marc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Aug 2014 09:29:18 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think you are too kind about the owner.
First, I'd try cleaning the sink to see if it is worth keeping. Plain old Comet cleanser does a good job with one of those green scrubby things.
There are new products every week, but unless you find something better, silicone would be my first choice. Getting the old stuff cleaned up will take some time but it must be clean and dry for the new stuff to work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| what should normally/usually be used to seal this counter-top & sink ? | | [it appears the previous owner may have done a hasty job] |
Any sealant should be underneath the counter. I've never seen sealant put around the inside like that. On the other hand, usually an undermount doesn't extend past the hole perimeter, so normally there's nothing to seal. In other words, usually the top surface of the sink is covered by the counter.
I would try just cleaning off the mess and leave it. If it doesn't leak around the edges under the counter then don't do anything more. You've got granite or composite and stainless steel. Neither is water-sensitive and there's probably some sealant between them. So there's no reason any more should be needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like Mayayana's idea:
clean out the excess, exposed caulk, and see if it leaks
and if it leaks, then start from scratch, with silicone, or similar
thanks all marc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com;3271510 Wrote:

Marc:
I don't believe that's an undermount sink. I think what's happening here is that someone has installed a drop in sink as an undermount sink.
Normally, undermount sinks are installed with fasteners from below. Holes are drilled in the underside of the granite, and threaded studs are epoxied into those holes. Then, threaded fasteners are used to fasten the sink to the epoxied studs on the underside of the granite.
I partially agree with Mayayama. I'd cut away that caulk to make the installation look decent and then see if it leaks. If it leaks, I'd hire a counter top company to properly install a new undermount sink. It looks to me that someone got a granite counter top cheap, and tried to fit a sink to it as best they could. But, quite honestly, the workmanship looks like it was done by a monkey. You have an attractive and durable counter top, but it's messed up by a stupid installation of a drop in sink. Put in a proper undermount sink and it'll increase the value of your home.
I'd be reluctant to use a regular bathroom silicone caulk here. As was mentioned, silicone caulks meant for bathtubs contain mildewcides. Mildew will grow on silicone caulk nonetheless if you make a practice of using bar soap in that kitchen sink, (so make a point of not using bar soap in it). Use only dish washing detergents instead. And, you can buy silicone meant for making and repairing aquariums at any pet supply store that won't contain mildewcides. Mildew feeds on the fatty acids of the animal fats and vegetable oils used to make bar soap. I would be inclined to use a caulk called "Kop-R-Lastic" to seal around the sink. Kop-R-Lastic sticks very well, but it sticks to itself even better than it does to construction materials. So, when you want to remove the caulk, you just get an end started and it pulls off cleanly like a rubber rope. I would use that instead of silicone because it would allow you to replace the caulk quicly and easily should you have mildew problems with it.
Maybe get under the counter top and feel the perimeter of the stainless steel sink from below. If it feels concave, so that the perimeter lip of the sink curves downward toward you, then it's a drop in sink being used as an undermount sink. That curvature on a drop in sink is to prevent the plumber's putty used to seal around a drop in sink from getting squeezed out onto the counter top. The curvature traps a bead of plumber's putty under the perimeter of the sink to prevent water from leaking off the counter top and into the cabinetry under the sink.
--
nestork

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.