toilet flange

I'm working on remodeling a small bathroom. When I removed the toilet, I discovered that the circular metal piece on the toilet flange is pretty much toast. The nails that went into the floor were rusted badly, the floor has some rot, but it looks like the flange is glued into the PVC below. I can access this from the basement, can probably replace the rotted plywood floor, but how can that flange be replaced if it is glued into the PVC below. It is on the outside of the PVC. There isn't much room to cut the existing drain pipe and put new pieces back in place. This seems like it would be a common problem in older homes and I don't understand why this flange would be glued to the PVC underneath. Is their an alternative way to fix this.
Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks
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The flange is PVC too? If it's PVC it's guaranteed to be glued. One piece fits into the piece below it. If you don't have much room you might be able to use a rubber sleeve; it joins two sections of pipe by slipping over each and there's a band clamp on each end to be tightened.
Mike
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if the flange is too close to the first elbow to cut it and put in a coupling, then you have to cut out the elbow also, and work back 'till you have a long enough straight piece to couple up to. then work back towards the flange with new pieces.
s

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On Tue, 24 Jun 2008 21:34:35 -0500, "S. Barker"

You can cut off the old flange and replace it with a special repair flange that fits inside the closet elbow. Probably need to go to a real plumbing supply house to get one. If the flange is high enough you can cut it off using a hacksaw blade, but I usually use a dremel with one of those little saw blades and slice it off from the inside. I think you can only get the inside mounting flanges for 4" pipe. If your closet el is 3" this won't work.
Sometimes, once you've cut the flange off as above, you can carefully chisel off the remaining collar of the old flange, clean up the closet el and glue on a new flange. But only try this if you are able to replace the closet el should it crack when you're attempting to remove the old flange collar.
HTH,
Paul
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I agree with the other 2 posters who each took a slightly different read on your post.
PVC pipe, fittings and glue are cheap. Cut it back to where you have at least 2" of straight pipe and rebuild it after you do the floor.
Post a pic somewhere and someone here will give more detailed advice.
Colbyt
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