Toggle switches

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For aesthetic purposes I wanted to use toggle switches as those commonly used on electronic equipment for use as light switches in a room. Plan is to make my own cover plates from brushed aluminum. What would the requirements be to make these code compliant if that is possible, The switches I have are rated for 120VAC @ 20 amp DPDT I was planing on using these switches as for both the single switch, 3 way and 4 way operation.
Jimmie
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** I would think that as long as they are rated for the proper voltage and amperage, they should be fine. Those switches are fine for single pole and 3 way operation, but they won't work for 4 way
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These might be harder to hit on your way out of the room, or as easy to hit but harder to flip. But maybe it will cause you to slow down.

I think they will. I still use a DPDT slide switch on a volt meter to change polarity for the leads.
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wrote:

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.
They work fine for 4 way. Connect the NCs to the NOs. The wiring will look like an X on the back of the switch . Connect one pair of traveler wires to the C terminals conect the ohter pair to either the NC or NO terminals, doesnt matter .just as long as one wire is on each leg of the X.
Jimmie
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Why not? All you have to do is cross connect the switched contacts. I have my air compressor set up that way as we speak using low voltage but the logic is the same. I have 5 ports with a switch at each location.
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On May 15, 2:07pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

.
My first thought was along the lines of what RBM said, ie as long as the switches are rated for the voltage/current, they should be OK. But then upon thinking about it a little more, isn't there the issue of grounding? Normal wall switches have grounding lugs, while the kind of toggle switches Jimmie is talking about do not. And most of them also have metal parts protruding beyond the cover plate. Isn't that a code issue?
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My first thought was along the lines of what RBM said, ie as long as the switches are rated for the voltage/current, they should be OK. But then upon thinking about it a little more, isn't there the issue of grounding? Normal wall switches have grounding lugs, while the kind of toggle switches Jimmie is talking about do not. And most of them also have metal parts protruding beyond the cover plate. Isn't that a code issue?
Not an issue if the boxes are metal. If they're plastic, the switches would need a ground connection
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Use one of these:
http://www.newark.com/productimages/nio/standard/4385966.jpg
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On Tue, 17 May 2011 00:11:53 -0400, Leopold Samsonite

Yep and I have even seen them with a green wire pigtail attached.
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I'm looking at your diagram, and I'm thinking "why do you have six terminals?" My mistake, he did write "double throw"
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*Article 404.9(B) requires that the metal wall plate be grounded. This is usually accomplished through the grounding of the switch.
Article 110.2 requires that the equipment shall be acceptable only if approved for the purpose. There should be a UL or other recognized testing laboratory label on it. You can contact the manufacturer to find out if they have submitted the switches for testing for the purpose that you intend.
If you are installing new wiring, the 2011 National Electrical Code requires a neutral conductor at each switch location Article 404.2(C).
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** John, does the new article on neutrals at switch locations, specify anything regarding 3ways and 4ways?

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*Roy I just had my mandatory 9 hours of code class this past week and that article was a heated discussion because of 3-ways and 4-ways. It doesn't matter what switch type it is. A neutral conductor must be present. It is because of the variety of electronic controls available now that require a neutral to operate. Apparently when there is no neutral available, people have been using the grounding conductor. There are some exceptions, but they are as result of accessibility in adding a neutral in the future such as if the wiring was in conduit and another conductor could be pulled through at a later date.
For a three-way set up where the load is at one end and the line is at the other end, the neutral is of course carried through. However if you want to bring everything into one box and just extend out for a three way switch, you will need four conductors plus ground. I suggested in the class that using 14-2-2 with one conductor relabeled may be a solution. I will have to run it by a few inspectors to see what they will accept. NJ has not yet adopted the 2011 code and they usually will eliminate some things as being required after much discussion publicly and privately.
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Most of the new electronic devices I've seen lately, that replace 3way and 4way switches, don't wire in the same fashion as the switches did, and they only need a neutral at one end, but who knows what's on the horizon. Here is NY we just started using the 2008 code a few months ago, so I have years before I have to worry about it

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*Another big change which becomes effective January 1, 2014 is the requirement for replacement receptacles. 2011 requires that receptacles being replaced in living areas be replaced with tamper resistant receptacles. In 2014 they will need to be arc fault circuit interrupter tamper resistant receptacles. Article 406.4(D)(4) Can't wait to see the price of those.
I heard NYC is using the 2005 NEC.
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** I suppose that makes sense. The manufacturers need time to deplete existing stocks, as do suppliers, but I would imagine that some really large projects in NYC take years to complete, so they'd be allowed to use the original plans with whatever the code du jour was when the project started

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On Sun, 15 May 2011 15:31:42 -0400, "John Grabowski"

These toggle switches are common in industrial equipment and there is a grounding washer with a tab and conductor that goes between the plate and the switch on the 1/2" threaded shaft for the purpose of grounding.
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wrote:

Close
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